Author Topic: The price of new boards/how do you choose?  (Read 1594 times)

NorthJerzSurfer

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Re: The price of new boards/how do you choose?
« Reply #15 on: August 11, 2019, 05:42:57 PM »
as an xxl surfer you need construction.  @ 220lbs, 250lbs on up....construction is your friend.

regular poly, lightly glassed customs all bad news.

i'd go production.   You will never find bombproof like you can with certain mass produced productions.  (trust me - i always want to support local...but heres a reason to stray)

 if you go custom, you will be very very heavy with most shapers that arent building with advance techniques.

the ONLY brand ive never gotten foot welts in.....which is a primary concern for big guys.....Jimmy Lewis.






Ichabod Spoonbill

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Re: The price of new boards/how do you choose?
« Reply #16 on: August 11, 2019, 06:03:09 PM »
I have different criteria than most of the other people here. I'm not so concerned with performance but durability and price. Since I live in a very rocky area, my boards need to take a beating, and since I'm not racing or doing any serious surfing, the high-end performance isn't important.

I look for a board that can perform reasonably well, take a beating, and carry my stuff. Craigslist can be useful if I know boards that will fit that category. A few years ago I got a well-worn NSP 14' board for $600. (Look up "ghost board" on this forum if you want the funny story.) I knew that model was tough enough so I bought it, and I still need to repair it a couple of times a season. I think if you go used you need to really know what you're buying. Otherwise I stick to the brands I trust, like Bic or NSP.
NSP 14' Race (Ghost)
Pau Hana 11' Big EZ Ricochet (Beluga)
Bic Ace-Tec 9'2"

burchas

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Re: The price of new boards/how do you choose?
« Reply #17 on: August 11, 2019, 06:05:05 PM »
if you go custom, you will be very very heavy with most shapers that arent building with advance techniques.

+1. That was my experience with most.
- M15 15x27x4.5 https://bit.ly/2WmuEpt
- Ocean Ripple 16x25 @ 251L
- SIC Standamaran (S-16) - https://goo.gl/7myGAo
- Wide Tail 10x31x4 @ 149L
- SIC FX 12.6 2X - https://goo.gl/GOkSHT
- Red 2017 Elite 14x25
- ZRE Lightning 75
- Kenalu Mana 82
- Kialoa Hulu 87
- QuickBlade Trifecta 86

exiled

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Re: The price of new boards/how do you choose?
« Reply #18 on: August 11, 2019, 07:58:15 PM »
Custom shapers are getting better technique wise. My 8'3 Rawson is 14 lbs. My Dave Mel custom was maybe a half pound more, but miles more durable than my production Sunova has been. Dave Mel has a long background in custom windsurfers, I would trust the durability of any custom from someone who can build a good custom windsurfer. I have had great luck with the budget starboard constructions, but they weren't always the lightest.

TallDude

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Re: The price of new boards/how do you choose?
« Reply #19 on: August 11, 2019, 08:47:22 PM »
I was sick of repairing my custom 9' green machine. I beat it up pretty good to. I was hunting for a board that was better suited for my break (typical mush burgers). It is either a longboard or a Simmon's shape. I went through a series of buy and sell 10' ish boards. Then an almost brand new Coreban Icon came up on CL. I knew these were built bullet proof at the Cobra factory and retail for a lot more than I would ever pay. I didn't like it at first because I'm used to a more skatey board. This is more a performer longboard. After a few fin changes I figured it out. It grew on me. I surfed it for the last 3 years. I was on the rocks a ton of times. I've never had to repair it once. Just chipped paint. BUT!!!! I really missed a high performance board that flexes. Now I've got my new L41 that I love. I've surfed it about 8 times and since I bought it, and it's already bubbling from a ding in the rail. Just like old times. Got it draining on my truck rack and will repair it when it stop dripping. The price I pay for the board I love.... for now.

LBsup

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Re: The price of new boards/how do you choose?
« Reply #20 on: August 12, 2019, 02:43:22 AM »
as an xxl surfer you need construction.  @ 220lbs, 250lbs on up....construction is your friend.

regular poly, lightly glassed customs all bad news.

i'd go production.   You will never find bombproof like you can with certain mass produced productions.  (trust me - i always want to support local...but heres a reason to stray)

 if you go custom, you will be very very heavy with most shapers that arent building with advance techniques.

the ONLY brand ive never gotten foot welts in.....which is a primary concern for big guys.....Jimmy Lewis.
Hey NJS, I must have lead feet cause my superfrank has foot wells. I believe you noticed it right away when you demoed the board.  Still won’t stop me from getting another one from JL which should be arriving on Tuesday.   ;D
JL Super Frank 8’6” x 32
Fanatic Allwave 9’2”

Area 10

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Re: The price of new boards/how do you choose?
« Reply #21 on: August 12, 2019, 07:03:55 AM »
My customs are absolutely bullet-proof, and far more durable than any production board I’ve had. Not significantly heavier either. So I think it just depends on who made your board, and what you asked them to make. Not many people say to the shaper “I’m more interested in it being strong and durable than light”. But I did, so that’s what I got.

Mind you, my next production board is going to be double-carbon full PVC sandwich around a good quality core, plus a wooden stringer, and vacuum-bagged three times. So it will be interesting to see how strong and durable (and heavy) that turns out to be.