Author Topic: Big waves are fun but expensive.  (Read 2013 times)

opie

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Re: Big waves are fun but expensive.
« Reply #15 on: December 24, 2018, 10:20:18 AM »
Was this at Dillon?  That same thing happened to me and my Lift foil was ripped from the board last year... still out there somewhere near sharpit.  Looking at a 15-20ft barrel coming at you its hard to imagine any kind of foil setup surviving.  FYI, you won't see me out there for a while, I broke my arm in three places mountain biking.  My Jimmy Lewis FlyingV is still holding up and it has taken some big hits, great riding board!


Ouch!  Hope you get a full and quick recovery.

I was in the same area.  Just north of sharkpit there was a deep area that was making a more manageable peak.  There was a double overhead left breaking all the way across the mouth of Tomales to sharkpit.  I've never seen it like that. I guess one ran a little wider and swallowed me up.

I have a question for you.  If you lost your board would you buy another 6'5" or would you look at the 5'11' 105 liter Flying V?

 

opie

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Re: Big waves are fun but expensive.
« Reply #16 on: December 24, 2018, 10:26:40 AM »
Opie, you're underestimating the strength of brass--yield strength of even garbage brass is 120mpa, the high strength stuff is 300+. If I were going to try metal it would be aluminum. Don't bother with T-nuts, just make some tabs and thread them. You can try different thicknesses and different heat treats. At the soft end, annealed 1100 is about 35MPA yield and 6061 T6 is 275. Some of the unusual alloys go higher, but you could get a lot of range with just a few thicknesses of aluminum bar stock. You can even buy 6061 T6 and anneal some of it to get down to about 70.


This could be quite the rabbit hole.  I think I will start with plastic just to get a feel for it.  Maybe cannibalize various materials from home and work.

sharksupper

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Re: Big waves are fun but expensive.
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2018, 07:44:19 PM »
Was this at Dillon?  That same thing happened to me and my Lift foil was ripped from the board last year... still out there somewhere near sharpit.  Looking at a 15-20ft barrel coming at you its hard to imagine any kind of foil setup surviving.  FYI, you won't see me out there for a while, I broke my arm in three places mountain biking.  My Jimmy Lewis FlyingV is still holding up and it has taken some big hits, great riding board!


Ouch!  Hope you get a full and quick recovery.

I was in the same area.  Just north of sharkpit there was a deep area that was making a more manageable peak.  There was a double overhead left breaking all the way across the mouth of Tomales to sharkpit.  I've never seen it like that. I guess one ran a little wider and swallowed me up.

I have a question for you.  If you lost your board would you buy another 6'5" or would you look at the 5'11' 105 liter Flying V?

I saw that 5'11 offering after getting the 6'5 and thought about it.  I think I'm happy with the 6'5.  Even up to 180-185lbs its just fine to paddle and float around easy.  Maybe if I was consistently in the 160lb range I'd opt for the 5'11.  The 6'5 certainly never feels big to me, it pumps back out easy...if you have the stamina for it  ;)  I got a carbon but Jimmy says the glass is just as strong, and weight is not much different.

supstoked

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Re: Big waves are fun but expensive.
« Reply #18 on: December 29, 2018, 02:17:29 PM »
KINGS Paddlesports makes the strongest looking Tuttle that I have seen. (Sorry I donít have a photo).  The high density foam block surrounding the actual box is much larger than other brands. Itís called appropriately, KING TUT.  They also make a track box setup that is much the same. Back in the day of big windsurfing, Chinook made a fin box that had rod type appendage that extended out of the bottom of the box, which effectively made the box extend to the deck of the board. That would be an simple modification of the fin box mold that would provide super strength (if any manufacturers are reading this).  When the rod wasnít needed, it was a simple matter to grind it flush prior to install.
Lots of foil boards 6í7Ē-7í4Ē, L41 TVDís and Jimmy Lewis Strikers..

Dwight (DW)

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Re: Big waves are fun but expensive.
« Reply #19 on: December 29, 2018, 05:30:18 PM »
Chinook still makes it with the rod out the back

clay

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Re: Big waves are fun but expensive.
« Reply #20 on: December 30, 2018, 01:05:40 PM »
This one Opie.
I have used this technique for all my boards still not had one move.
Cheers
Scuba

This looks great!  Have the installs been with or without deck patches (carbon?)?   If yes, any thoughts on the strength without patches?  Maybe longer stringers or balsa blocks?

I'm really reluctant to use pour foam and carbon patches and looking for a cleaner/greener method.
Aloha, I welcome and appreciate all responses of positivity and good feeling.

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOIE6FWr1SpWvbPJIIiEgog

rbgar

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Re: Big waves are fun but expensive.
« Reply #21 on: December 31, 2018, 09:33:27 AM »
bottom of my kite foilboard, I added a bit of carbon, no problems!