Author Topic: Laminating on a Table  (Read 11130 times)

Dwight (DW)

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 3396
    • View Profile
    • supSURFmachines
Laminating on a Table
« on: March 30, 2013, 06:47:36 PM »
http://ncpaddlesurfer.blogspot.com/2013/03/windsurf-progress.html

The video is here. My camera memory card ran out before the vacuum bagging started.

808sup

  • Sunset Status
  • ****
  • Posts: 437
    • View Profile
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2013, 09:53:06 PM »
Thanks for the illustration video! You seem so relaxed while glassing. What is the time period that you have once mixing has begun to in the bag? Keep the videos coming!

SEA

  • Peahi Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 999
    • View Profile
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2013, 11:26:55 PM »
WOW no mask in a closed room with resin ??  You are old school my man !!  good Job :)

Dwight (DW)

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 3396
    • View Profile
    • supSURFmachines
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2013, 04:09:43 AM »
Thanks for the illustration video! You seem so relaxed while glassing. What is the time period that you have once mixing has begun to in the bag? Keep the videos coming!

About 45 minutes. 2 layers in the bag.

Dwight (DW)

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 3396
    • View Profile
    • supSURFmachines
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2013, 04:15:49 AM »
WOW no mask in a closed room with resin ??  You are old school my man !!  good Job :)
I wear a full face respirator with tyvek hood during sanding. I have a skin sensitivity to epoxy only from sanding dust.

Chilly

  • Peahi Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 849
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2013, 05:14:20 AM »
Nice setup. I look very efficient.
NSP 2016 12'6 Surf Race Pro

punasurf

  • Sunset Status
  • ****
  • Posts: 301
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2013, 10:35:25 AM »
Can you give us some details on your mix?

Cloth weight and width?

Resin quantity?  Brand?  Must be slow resin?

You made that look just too easy.  If you had seen me you would have been dismayed.  I looked like a total clown when I tried my first and only wet out table.  I think I will have to try again.  I am really trying to get the weight down on my next boards.

Thanks for the video.  We all appreciate seeing how to do things the right way.

Dwight (DW)

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 3396
    • View Profile
    • supSURFmachines
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2013, 01:46:15 PM »
Can you give us some details on your mix?

Cloth weight and width?

Resin quantity?  Brand?  Must be slow resin?



Greenroom resin. Fast hardener. (Not California fast) They make two fast hardeners. The CA fast is for the pros only.

4 oz S (44 wide) Aerialite cloth

I pour 37 grams of resin per foot of cloth. So 9.5 ft of cloth required 350 grams of resin. I don't count harder in my calculations.

Always mix by weight, not volume. So get a scale. Weight the resin, multiply by 0.44 and this is how much hardener to add.

getsupngo

  • Rincon Status
  • ***
  • Posts: 212
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2013, 02:18:55 PM »
WOW no mask in a closed room with resin ??  You are old school my man !!  good Job :)
I wear a full face respirator with tyvek hood during sanding. I have a skin sensitivity to epoxy only from sanding dust.

Epoxy can seem hard enough to sand but it may not always be fully cured to sand it safely. That's when its really best to cover up. It gets more inert as it fully cures. I tend to let it cure some as it sands better and is less irritating.
 

punasurf

  • Sunset Status
  • ****
  • Posts: 301
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2013, 04:39:42 PM »
so 37 grams resin/foot = 111 grams per yard + 49 grams hardner = 160 grams per yard divided by 28 (28 grams per oz) = 5.7 oz of resin and hardner for 4 oz cloth.  Seems perfect.

I need to find my old notes to see what my quantities were when I tried it.  I think that I have the math correct.  Please correct me if I am missing something here.

Thanks for posting.

I am surprised that is fast resin. 

Dwight (DW)

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 3396
    • View Profile
    • supSURFmachines
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #10 on: March 31, 2013, 06:52:25 PM »
WOW no mask in a closed room with resin ??  You are old school my man !!  good Job :)
I wear a full face respirator with tyvek hood during sanding. I have a skin sensitivity to epoxy only from sanding dust.

Epoxy can seem hard enough to sand but it may not always be fully cured to sand it safely. That's when its really best to cover up. It gets more inert as it fully cures. I tend to let it cure some as it sands better and is less irritating.
 

I post cure at 110 degrees for 24 hours. Sands like a dream.

getsupngo

  • Rincon Status
  • ***
  • Posts: 212
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #11 on: March 31, 2013, 08:15:18 PM »
I figure you're on top of it.  I just know of some people that had severe reaction problems, mostly due to sanding uncured epoxy.  Cured epoxy doesn't bother me but uncured can. I also like doing the thermal post cure.   

Thanks for posting the video and all the great info.   

TallDude

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 4947
  • Capistrano Beach native
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2013, 11:06:54 PM »
My turn for a dumb question. So I do my layup at around 70 deg. Then heat my shop to 110 deg? How soon after?  I have some heaters that should be able to get it close to that. How do you heat it up?

jdmotes

  • JD Motes
  • Teahupoo Status
  • ******
  • Posts: 1745
    • View Profile
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2013, 04:24:02 AM »
 Great video there, D-dub... People really appreciate seeing what goes into the building of a surf/sup board.
 This is my 50th year in surfing and I never tire of watching this stuff and how each "Master" has their own technique... Thanks for going through the hassle of filming your work...  Paddle on,   JD
JD Motes/Water Bound Sports LLC
Florida; Ga; S.C; Sales Rep for:
Progressive SUP
Exocet SUP
Kona SUP
Epic Gear SUP Paddles and Accessories
Ke Nalu Precision SUP Paddles

Dwight (DW)

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 3396
    • View Profile
    • supSURFmachines
Re: Laminating on a Table
« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2013, 04:43:31 AM »
My turn for a dumb question. So I do my layup at around 70 deg. Then heat my shop to 110 deg? How soon after?  I have some heaters that should be able to get it close to that. How do you heat it up?

Layup anywhere in the 70s is ideal.

The post cure takes place in my laundry room with a space heater. When the board is finished, but not sanded. Immediately after hot coat cures.

The local factory has a closet with a heater. The ideal post cure is 120 degrees for 24 hours. My heater trips at 110.

It makes the epoxy actually stronger. It raising the threshold, permanently, of where epoxy weakens from heat. It also makes the board ready to ride and full strength immediately.

The process of selling a board and telling the owner not to ride it for 2 weeks is the old way, and the wrong way. But I hear, some factories still don't post cure and tell their customers exactly that.

« Last Edit: April 01, 2013, 04:45:50 AM by DW »