Author Topic: 10' to 7'9" SUP?  (Read 2430 times)

SUPvol

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10' to 7'9" SUP?
« on: January 06, 2023, 06:12:11 AM »
How difficult would it be to go from a 10' to 7'9" SUP to surf on smaller east coast waves? I'm 5-6 160 and in the the early stages of looking for something I can travel to Fl better with. I now mostly surf in Va. Beach - I know it would be better to try before I buy, but was looking at a used 7'9" board near my son in Fla. Would mainly use in Jacksonville and Cocoa Beach on smaller thigh high waves - Thanks for any thoughts

Bean

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Re: 10' to 7'9" SUP?
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2023, 06:56:34 AM »
It's very subjective, in my case (at 195lbs 5'10") I find my 7'10" x 30.5" 110 L Phoenix (Simons shape) easily as stable as my 10' x 27" 122 L New Deal.  This is primarily because the Simons shape spreads out the volume with a wide tail, parallel rails and lower rocker (like a sheet of plywood). 

A 7'9" with a more pulled in tail, nose and more rocker would definitely be more difficult to balance initially, but at your weight and height should be totally doable.

joelcr

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Re: 10' to 7'9" SUP?
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2023, 08:08:17 AM »
Well, it just so happens Iíve got a 7í8 here available here in Virginia Beach. Designed by Dwight here on the Zone, and built in Wrightsville Beach. Youíre welcome to check it out and try it anytime you want. Just pm me.
The board works great in clean waves up to about chest high. But definitely is a lot more work than a bigger board. Iím about your size, and a little older!  Iíve since gone back up to 9 foot size boards as I like to surf bigger waves when I can.

joelcr

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Re: 10' to 7'9" SUP?
« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2023, 08:20:00 AM »
Hereís a picture of the board.

sflinux

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Re: 10' to 7'9" SUP?
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2023, 05:37:35 PM »
https://www.blueplanetsurf.com/blogs/news/sup-board-volume-recommendation-chart/
An advanced surfer typically wants a guild factor of 1.3 or larger.  With your weight of 160# = 72.7 kg.  You probably want a board 94.5 L to 131 L. That assumes semi-clean conditions.  Going from a 10' board to a sub 8' board, you will notice the lack of stability from nose to tail (pitch).  If you shrink a board in length, going wider relative in width helps with the side to side stability (roll).  Using large fins will help with twisting (yaw).  Let's say your 10' board was the infinity New Deal 10' x 27" 122L.  Going from 122L to 94L should be no problem with practice in clean conditions.  Ideally you would probably want to drop down 6" in length at a time if money was no object.  The Simmons (i.e SimSUP) shapes (7'10") feels similar in glide and stability to a traditional board that is 1 ft longer (8'10").

Just an example of <8' boards that Jimmy Lewis carries::
JL Supertech 7'10" x 27.5" 94L
JL Destroyer 7'7" x 29 100L
JL SF Narrow 7'6" x 29.5" 100L
JL Worldwide 7'9" x 29" 103L
JL SF Wide 7'6" x 31" 115L

I would think the Supertech would be the most challenging of the bunch.  At 7'10", you probably want a board that is at least 29" wide, 31" would be more stable in non smooth conditions.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2023, 05:47:12 PM by sflinux »
Quiver Shaped by: Joe Blair, Blane Chambers, Jimmy Lewis, Kirk McGinty, and Bob Pearson.
Me: 200#, 6'2"

sflinux

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Re: 10' to 7'9" SUP?
« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2023, 08:50:06 PM »
The way I think of shortening a board relative to another is you lose equal distance at nose and tail, relative to your paddle stance.  Going from 120" to 94", you are losing 26", so your nose will be shorter by 13" and your tail will be shorter by 13".
Measure your 10' board and put a mark of tape 13" from the nose, and another mark 13" from the tail.  Paddle out and have a look.  Imagine that first 13" of nose not being able to touch the water.  To do that you will have to put more weight on the tail.  I find that moving to smaller boards, keeping weight on the heels helped with balance, preventing the nose from catching.  A staggered paddle stance is ideal for balance.
With a smaller board, the paddle cadence changes.  You no longer want to do long power strokes, instead shorter strokes with a higher cadence is better for balance.  Practice paddling never letting your paddle go past the your heels.
With a 10' board you are most likely used to moving your feet around.  With a sub 8' board, any changes in your feet position are small, less than half a step.
Losing 3" at nose and tail is a very smooth transition [i.e 8'6" Simsup or 9'6" traditional].  Losing 6" at nose and tail may take some practice to get used to.  [i.e 8' Simsup or 9' traditional]
Quiver Shaped by: Joe Blair, Blane Chambers, Jimmy Lewis, Kirk McGinty, and Bob Pearson.
Me: 200#, 6'2"

Badger

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Re: 10' to 7'9" SUP?
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2023, 04:08:41 AM »
Width is a more important stability factor than length. I had an 8'4 x 29" that was less stable than my 7'6 x 31". The problem with most boards under 8 feet is that they are often very narrow.

Also, don't equate volume with stability. Boards with too much volume for your weight can be less stable than a board that sits lower in the water. For good stability, you want the deck pad to be about equal to the water surface or slightly above. For 160 lbs, I would stay below 120 liters and look for a target volume around 100 to 110.
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Sunova Flow  8'10 X 31"  119L
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Tom

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Re: 10' to 7'9" SUP?
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2023, 07:56:26 AM »
I think the biggest difference you'll find is in wave catching,  even if stability is not a problem.  A 10 ft board will glide into waves and you can catch softer waves. With a shorter board, you need to be positioned closer to be taking off at the steepest spot. Also, a shorted board doesn't track as straight as a 10 footer, so your paddle technique is more critical.

sailwave

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Re: 10' to 7'9" SUP?
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2023, 06:25:34 PM »
If you can manage to only surf in clean low chop/low backwash conditions, then the jump is possible on just about any board with enough enthusiam and time on water, but my read is it will be a stretch for you. For your size, I would go with something 8'6"ish 110Lish, 29-30 inch wide. I find anything more than 30 inches wide is slow rail to rail and sluggish.
185 lb, 5' 10"
Starboard 9' Pro  (windsup option)
Mistral Pacifico Wave 11' (windsup option)
Starboard 8'5" Pocket Rocket (windsup option)
Naish Hover Crossover 7'4" (windfoil, wingfoil, SUP foil, SUP)

SlatchJim

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Re: 10' to 7'9" SUP?
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2023, 11:48:21 AM »
Shorty SUPs are wonderful once you catch the wave.  My problem was that I grew to like some paddling glide to catch waves.

 


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