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Author Topic: Forward Stroke  (Read 1166 times)

Quickbeam

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Forward Stroke
« on: May 01, 2023, 10:10:40 AM »
I don't come on this site very much anymore as it seems to be mostly about Wings and Wing Surfing now. I suppose that's OK, as I understand that things evolve.

But if any of you are still interested in regular, stand up paddling, I ran across a video about the forward stroke that I thought you might enjoy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXEkDe4SkPg&t=975s
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surf4food

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Re: Forward Stroke
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2023, 03:50:35 PM »
"I don't come on this site very much anymore as it seems to be mostly about Wings and Wing Surfing now. I suppose that's OK, as I understand that things evolve."

I don't come on here as much either for the same reason. Nothing against foiling (I hope to take lessons at some point) and there's been some great posts about it on here, but it's not so much an evolution as it is a whole separate sport. Well at least wing foiling.

surf4food

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Re: Forward Stroke
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2023, 03:52:30 PM »
I don't come on this site very much anymore as it seems to be mostly about Wings and Wing Surfing now. I suppose that's OK, as I understand that things evolve.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXEkDe4SkPg&t=975s

I don't come on here as much either for the same reason. Nothing against foiling (I hope to take lessons at some point) and there's been some great posts about it on here, but it's not so much an evolution as it is a whole separate sport. Well at least wing foiling.

supthecreek

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Re: Forward Stroke
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2023, 04:41:03 AM »
Thanks for this video Quickbeam... I really like his approach.

For SUP surfers, the best part of this video was actually in the first "comment" below the video when you click the "YouTube" link in your post (oddly couldn't find it when I went to his channel and returned to this video)

His answer to the question on how to paddle straight on a foil SUP or a surf SUP is very interesting!
hint: he says the "J Stroke" is all wrong!

I am going to learn his technique!!

I'll post a copy/paste in case that question is hard to find:
------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Jurie, apologies for the delay replying.  So this is quite a complex topic. As you are finding, the problem on smaller surfing/foiling SUP boards is that the boards are more inclined to turn. The shorter the board, the more of a problem this is - to the point that on a very short surf SUP just one 'normal' stroke can turn the board 90 degrees. Greater width, and/or a more rounded planshape generally, also increases this problem.



So how do you deal with this? There are a whole bunch of minor technique variations that can mitigate it, but here are your main three work-ons:



1. Ensure that your current stroke is as efficient as possible. Again it comes back to the catch.  The more of your stroke out front, where is it pulling the board forward, rather than encouraging it to turn, the better.  So you still want to get that perfect catch as far forward as is comfortable.  The paddle needs to be as vertical as possible, perhaps even over-canted, ie slightly more than vertical, so it feels like you are pulling the blade in under your board.



2.  Shorten your stroke slightly, at the back. In other words stop applying power even before the paddle reaches your feet.  Because this end of the stroke is where the most turning is happening. High cadence short strokes out front really helps to pull your board forward.



3.  Introduce some draw into your stroke AT THE FRONT.  You absolutely do not want to do a J stroke, where the turning element of the stroke happens at the back.  Instead, learn to introduce some draw into the start of your stroke.  This is absolutely best learned on flat water, well away from any distractions of surf.  To start with, break it down into its two components - put the blade into the water up by the nose but further out than usual, then just pull it in to the nose, at 90 degrees to your direction of travel. So it is JUST a turning stroke. The nose should come towards the blade.  Learn to do this draw.  Then, just as the blade is about to make contact with the board, turn it so it becomes a normal paddle stroke. So basically the blade is doing an inverted L .  Once you have got the hang of this and can keep paddling on one side all the time without the board turning, then you can start working on smoothing out the path of the blade, so it is less of a right angles corner on your stroke line. It becomes a 'reverse J' stroke. Learning this will take time and practice. But for SUP surfing it's a really game-changing skill to have.  If you have to change sides when you are paddling for a wave - you will not catch the wave.

Ultimately, this type of paddling is much less efficient than normal paddling, and you would never really use this technique in a race, for example. But on a short board it allows you to paddle straight which is a major winner.
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sflinux

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Re: Forward Stroke
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2023, 10:44:51 PM »
I'm curious as to what you think of this technique creek.
Another technique to try is the 45 as recommended by Joe Blair.  It is simple and effective.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-LrmGFoW2k
Rather than make your paddle do all the work, you can use your board to help with tracking.  To get a feel for this, try paddling without a fin.  To help track straight, you dip a rail while paddling, using the rail of the board, like a snowboard holding an edge.  If the board is too flat, your tail will slide out.  You want to bury that tail some and surf the glide of each paddle stroke.
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supthecreek

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Re: Forward Stroke
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2023, 11:47:00 AM »
Hi sflinux,

I have always used the same technique you mention on flatwater.... if I "weight" the rail on the same side as the paddle I can paddle straight forever without switching sides.

In surf, if I weight the rail too much it will slow the board, so I simply aim out to sea when waiting for a wave.... then I paddle left side only, as I arc slightly around into the takeoff spot. (picture below)
This requires some timing, but it's simple and effective for me.

If I get slightly overturned before I release down the wave, I will sometimes pull the nose a little as Bill explained in my reply above, but not by pulling the paddle at a 45 degree angle as Joe recommends.... it seems awkward to me, but Joe Blair put some interesting information into his video.
 
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