Author Topic: Prone paddling out over breaking waves  (Read 1595 times)

sflinux

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Prone paddling out over breaking waves
« on: September 20, 2021, 11:11:57 AM »
Anyone use this technique?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1KbQdgSpuA
https://supboardermag.com/2020/09/19/prone-paddling-over-waves-with-a-sup-how-to-sup-surf-video/
You place the back of the blade against the board at an angle to the nose of the board, and the shaft goes under your shoulder.  You sit on the board, with the nose up, and pop over the wave.

Or how about this technique, Method A?

https://www.theseasonedsurfer.com/prone-paddling-sup-beginner-tips/
You place the blade between your legs and lie on the shaft with the handle near the nose of the board.

The technique that I have been using is Method B here.

https://www.theseasonedsurfer.com/prone-paddling-sup-beginner-tips/
You place the front of the blade against the board and make a sandwich with your chest and the board, with the handle facing the nose of the board.
I tend to use this technique when there is strong onshore wind and the interval between waves is short.
But I have discovered a flaw in this method B technique.  I recently discovered a crack in my carbon shaft, (located on the side of the front of the blade).  Theory as to how the damage occurred to follow.   Next, I reverted to DIY wooden paddles.  While going over a wave, the nose tilts up, then as I drop down the back of the wave, the shaft would snap towards the deck of the board, while my weight is on the blade.  That stress was enough to fracture the wood in the blade (note: the epoxy joint holding the shaft to the blade was unaffected).  I then came in and repeated the process with another wood DIY paddle.  Two snapped paddles in one session, both broke the same way.  Then I got to thinking about my carbon paddle, the carbon is stronger than the wood, so the failure happened at a different location, where the shaft whacked the deck of my board.  Now I am thinking I need to employ a new technique while prone paddling out to the lineup.  Does anyone care to share their preferred prone paddling technique to get back to the lineup with breaking waves, perhaps one of the techniques mentioned above, or perhaps something different.
p.s. I am aware of standup and knee paddle techniques, mainly just interested in prone here.
Thanks.

« Last Edit: September 20, 2021, 11:18:27 AM by sflinux »
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Caribsurf

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Re: Prone paddling out over breaking waves
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2021, 11:52:24 AM »
I have always tried to use method B with the blade under my chest against the board.  I have never had any issues with cracks that I know of.  I might have to go back and examine the paddle more closely.

Sometimes the situation is such that I don't have time to organize for A or B and just frantically scratch for the horizon with the paddle under me somewhere (method C)

The worst is the one handed paddling while holding paddle in the other hand...I feel like Curly from the 3 Stooges.
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liv2surf

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Re: Prone paddling out over breaking waves
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2021, 02:20:34 PM »
I have used method B for years (which is a variation of method A). I have seen others use Method A and it does seem to have some benefits of not hurting paddle blade or chest and the shaft doesn't have a chance to swing out from stringer axis...but B is my go to method.  The Supboarder Pro method looks interesting but tough for two reasons 1) having one of the hands needed for paddle and board and 2) pointing nose up and trying to ride over the whitewater.   From surfing (and SUP) experience, trying to ride over whitewater (instead of having it roll over you) acn be disasterous when wave pushes more than those shown and throws you onto your back with the lip. Also, seems if your hand slips off rail due to holding paddle and board you can get the board pushed into you face by white water. I guess this is the toughest thing about getting back outside on a SUP.
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surfcowboy

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Re: Prone paddling out over breaking waves
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2021, 09:19:26 PM »
I'll make it simple. I think method A is suicidal. So many things to go wrong.

If it’s of any size at all, stand up, paddle out. These boards are too big to play around with and try to hold.

sflinux

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Re: Prone paddling out over breaking waves
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2021, 07:58:12 AM »
Very sound advice.
If the wave has already broken and is over a few feet tall, I typically go to leash, or point the nose to the beach and bring the tail to my chest (like tail handle technique).
However, if the wave is unbroken and I am trying to make it over, I have been doing method B.  I will try method A for paddle preservation.  The first method mentioned (in the video), looks like you are putting the brakes on before going over the wave.  If the wave has any significant height or steepness, going over the falls would be super sketchy using the sit-down pop-over technique.
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Bean

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Re: Prone paddling out over breaking waves
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2021, 11:36:55 AM »
There are times when prone paddling might make sense.  For instance in short period conditions (one after the other, rapid fire), when I get knocked down on the inside during a paddle out, I might opt to prone paddle the last few yards out to the line-up.  I like to place the face of the blade under my chest with the paddle shaft offset to one side but still worry about getting smacked when I break through.  I feel that this is faster for me than getting back to my feet, or even kneeling.

PonoBill

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Re: Prone paddling out over breaking waves
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2021, 07:07:51 PM »
The only time I've bothered laying down to paddle is when the wave period is short. That doesn't describe many places I surf, but on occasion, either in Massachusetts or the Oregon Coast, it seems effective. Otherwise, I'd rather be on my feet. I can get out in 7-10 foot Hawaiian on my feet, I doubt I'd get anywhere fast enough on my belly--I don't prone paddle all that well--fucked shoulders. To me, prone paddling, even with a longboard, is mostly about surviving the wave, either by turning turtle or duck diving. Getting out with a SUP means aiming for the upbroken shoulder and going fast enough to get over it and keep going.
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Rider

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Re: Prone paddling out over breaking waves
« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2021, 07:27:38 PM »
“ I can get out in 7 to 10 feet Hawaiian on my feet”.    lol…..

PonoBill

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Re: Prone paddling out over breaking waves
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2021, 04:58:12 AM »
Yeah, I should have said "I have gotten out on 7 to 10 foot Hawaiian on my feet." The last el Nino year we had on Maui it was 7 to 10 at Kanaha more or less every day. There weren't a lot of choices, and I went every day that it wasn't totally closed out. But yeah, that was probably almost 10 years ago, I haven't paddled anything for the last two years since I've been concentrating on wing foiling, so I couldn't and wouldn't probably do it today. I don't see any way to get a big SUP board out through large surf on your belly. I can't duck dive a big floaty board, and rolling over only works in small stuff. The only choice is to find the channel and make the shoulders and that means you have to see where you are going and paddle hard.

It takes time to stand, recover your balance and start paddling. In short period waves sometimes I don't have enough time, so I belly paddle to get out. But that's always small surf.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2021, 05:14:28 AM by PonoBill »
Foote 10'4X34", SIC 17.5 V1 hollow and an EPS one in Hood River. Foote 9'0" x 31", L41 8'8", 18' Speedboard, etc. etc.

surfinJ

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Re: Prone paddling out over breaking waves
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2021, 12:00:03 AM »
Loads of good advice here and you seem to see the danger in confronting whitewater(except tiny) prone. Sooner or later you will get your board in your face.

Consider this. You are well clear of other surfers, ie no one in board plus leash distance behind you. Up until you decide to bail, ideal way to mount an unbroken wave is on your feet paddling.  Most of the time you are stroking hard, deep and whether you will make it over or not is not evident till you scratch over.

If you can not get over the top with the board and decide to eject at some point, your body will at least be mostly past the wave.


PonoBill

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Re: Prone paddling out over breaking waves
« Reply #10 on: September 28, 2021, 06:33:32 PM »
If nothing else, it feels like your birthday and Christmas together when you squeak over a feathering wave that was really going to pound the shit out of you--and you're still on your feet. There's an old thread here somewhere about getting over big waves. I always try to get over, even when it looks hopeless. If I bail it's off the back, kicking the board over if I can. I could probably count the number of times I just gave up and dove into the face of a wave on one hand. With a big, fat SUP board that's a recipe for being dragged a long way--or breaking a leash and having to swim all the way to the lagoon or beach.

Even in the face of whitewater you're better off on your feet. The resistance of your feet vs. the resistance of your body makes a big difference. And if/when you fall you're almost on the other side. If you leash and your karma are good, then recovery can be short.

I only know a few people who do well prone paddling SUP boards, and they go as fast or faster prone as I do standing and paddling. Even those prone-meisters tend to stand more often than not.
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finbox

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Re: Prone paddling out over breaking waves
« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2021, 07:22:40 PM »
I was taught at Sano to stay on your feet paddling at the whitewash - then at the last second kick the board at the whitewash so it goes up and over, with you landing in the flat green water on your back as you do a flip underwater & under the whitewash. If it works correct the board goes over the whitewash and you go under (doing a summersault) popping up on backside of the wave energy.
If I tried to laydown into that - it would be bad

 


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