Author Topic: Tips and tricks you've invented to get through the shorebreak/out of impact zone  (Read 1867 times)

wingdingjoe

  • Waikiki Status
  • *
  • Posts: 28
    • View Profile
    • Email

OK.. Sorry to be repetitive but I realized this post really should be a stand alone topic and not buried in the "body drag with your wing" thread... So here we go again :

I've been debating for a while to start a thread here about all the tips and tricks to get past shorebreak safely and efficiently. You guys are right that ALL the amazing wave riding videos are of spoiled kids launching from daddy's zodiac right next to the shoulder of the wave(ok.. I guess im picking on the New Caledonia and Hawaii bunch but for sure there are places where the "put in" is relatively easy and then they wing to the good swell spots) ... But the rest of us trying to get wave action in less than ideal launches... Sometimes really suffer.

One day in October I was trying to get out in onshore 32 knots in lake Ontario.. Thought I had the swell timed right and pushed like hell to get deep enough to hop on the board... When I realized that the bottom was NOT sand anymore but slick as ice Rocky slate slabs.. Holy crap did I get humbled.. Rejected.. Amazing my foil didn't kill me nor the wing.

I'm in 100%agreement that the old (bad mouthed for kiters) Reel leash has been a, godsend! I absolutely despise the coiled leashes which knot themselves up instantly... And I've had too many times when standing and pumping only to realize the normal leash is wrapped around the mast. Arrghh

The reel leash avoids ALL those problems and I've even went winging as hurricane ZETA was approaching the Mexican Caribbean coast and fallen and watched my entire kit fly 3 meters away in a vicious gust and the leash held up perfectly. It's the only piece of equipment that I rinse religiously with fresh water after every sesh.

Since I have the RL ATTACHED TO A LONG PIECE OF spektra on the back of my old ozone snow kite harness.. It's free to slide from side to side. On the tough onshore days I DO connect the wrist leash to that same spektra, flip the wing strut down, and try to squeeze it between my feet to keep in more under control as I paddle like crazy to get past the break.. All the time remembering what I hate most about normal surfing.. Lol..

As soon as I can, push to knees and grab the wing and get over the last big swells "knee sailing".. When I stand up.. Sometimes the wrist leash IS A BIT OF A MESS around my shoulders or whatever but I don't care (love  the stretchy f1 leash for this) and I get past the break.. Once out, carefully transfer leash to wrist and away I go. Id NEVER be able to paddle fast or efficiently enough of the 6mt wing was tied to my wrist.

I'd love to hear the techniques and tricks that the rest of your have developed to get our through serious shore break... What you do when you are paddling your ass off but the wave still Jack's up so much you can't get past and it throws you back... And what you do with the inevitable fall right in the champaign bubbles of the impact zone when you know you have to take 4 more waves on the head!

I purchased 2 NSI stick on anchor points and put them on the nose of the board.. And tied a thick piece of spektra between them as a handle.. With the Hope that at LEAST I CAN control the board and pull the nose down under the wave and not let the leash pay out to maximum length and pull me towards the shallow rocks.. Wing in tow and getting tangled..

Let's keep this thread gong for those that ride in waves and maybe we can save eachother some "wing-mares" by sharing what we've all learned the hard way.

Good winds!
Kyrojoe in mexico

PonoBill

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 24296
    • View Profile
If you're winging and you know the location well enough you can choose your mast so you can get up on the inside of the break. I use my 75 at Cardiff and wish for a 60. Even just on your knees with the board slogging but the wing pulling it's a lot easier getting out, but on your feet and on the foil it's nothing. Actually, it's fun blasting over the crap that was going to make your life miserable.

Getting stuck where you can't launch is the biggest problem. Even at Ka'a which is as close to a foilpark as I've seen, if you fall in the wrong place you're screwed. But if you can find a little area that clears the foil, get up to your feet as quick as possible and do everything you know to get up on your foil and high on the mast, then you're gold. Most times being in the rock garden means flipping your board over, doing your best to keep the damned foil from slashing up you wing, get to shore and do the walk of shame back to deeper water. But if you don't mind a few scratches on your foil, the quick get-up is a wonderful option to try. But you have to get up and stay up.

I find having a bottom handle is an absolute necessity if you have to enter and exit through shorebreak. Having your foil pointed away from you and your wing is a huge deal. Even if you have to pay to get one installed, it's ultimately cheaper than repairing/replacing a wing or carving up your thighs. The best handle for the bottom is the bridge ones, with the bridge aligned along the centerline of course. Not only is that the way you need to grab it, but also the bridge probably minimizes the turbulence of the hole in the bottom. Bridge handles give you great control, the best I've seen are the Flying Dutchman/SIC ones but the blue planet ones work well also.
Foote 10'4X34", SIC 17.5 V1 hollow and an EPS one in Hood River. Foote 9'0" x 31", L41 8'8", 18' Speedboard, etc. etc.

Phils

  • Sunset Status
  • ****
  • Posts: 275
    • View Profile
    • Email
I have been lucky enough to get out every time at our winter location on a wave day.  I basically wait for an opening and then prone paddle like a mad man till I clear the break.  I have waited up to 20 minutes for an opening.  I use the FOne wrist leashes and if I can hook my foot over the wing leading edge, there is enough slack/stretch to paddle. I practice prone paddling frantically a lot on non wave days.  I also like the reel leash for the board and agree that a bottom handle is essential.   

Having said all that, I am confident there will be days I cannot get out but we have back up flat water spots.   I am also confident that it is just a matter of time before I rip my wing in the waves.

All worth it for me.  The only aspect of foiling I care about are waves.   It’s why I love the Gorge.  Lots of waves and no shore break.


« Last Edit: February 18, 2021, 10:53:01 AM by Phils »

Caribsurf

  • Teahupoo Status
  • ******
  • Posts: 1761
    • View Profile
    • Email
I had a weight and rope that I would use for a mooring for my windsurfer in between sessions which I now use to attach my wing.  I set it out just past shorebreak and then I can work my way out with just the board. This scenario is in the Caribbean and its not a huge beach break but lots of urchins and coral and rocks so even a small wave is trouble.
It works well for me
Hobie Raw 8'10"
Jimmy Lewis Kwad 8'7"
L41 Bruce Wayne 8’10”
Jimmy Lewis Flying V foil SUP 6’11”
Fanatic Sky SUP foil SUP 6’6”
Coreban Rocket 10'6"
Hobie 14' race board

juandesooka

  • Waikiki Status
  • *
  • Posts: 44
    • View Profile
    • Email
I surf, kite, kitefoil, surf foil, sup foil, etc ... but by far wing foiling is the most out of control and humbling when getting worked in waves.  I broke my wing leash on a recent failed attempt, went over the falls backwards, wing and board entwined. Another I broke a foil wingtip ... though that was coming in, not going out ... which is another can of worms too!   I am also all about the waves...but play with fire you gonna get burned, only a matter of time before I destroy my gear.  :-[

I have reel leash attached to back of harness too.  The one local spot that's an issue, we go way down the beach to where there's a slight point, which makes the wave break a few feet further out, rather than shorepound....just enough to punch through. 

Getting up on board on your knees, but not yet standing....so awkward in between. One key for me is you must hit the white water straight on, even a little to the side and you might get broad sided. 

I've found if the wave is big enough and breaking hard enough that you are sure you aren't going to make it, then better to eject before it hits....let the board go, hold the wing out if you can.

Carib: great idea about mooring buoy....I have thought of that as an option too....paddle out board without wing, tie it off, then after swim out the wing....could maybe help in a situation where it's difficult or impossible otherwise.

surfcowboy

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 4386
    • View Profile
The small anchor is rad. We’ve also been thinking of trying the buddy system where one guy holds the boards and the other swims the wings out.

I’m hoping to just launch at point breaks where the shore break is manageable.

One trick a local guy told us is if you have harbors with a jetty often they protect a bit of the beach. This is common in SoCal and we have a couple of spots where you can launch protected and then surf. Check out Marina Del Rey on a map for an example. I’d wing a mile rather than fight the waves.

Keep this going but yeah, probably gonna be hard on waves.

Oh, one note about Hawaii. Lots of those spots are reefs where you can launch inside and cruise out to the reef. No need for a boat.

winddoctor

  • Waikiki Status
  • *
  • Posts: 25
    • View Profile
    • Email
I'm still using a wrist leash for the wing (not for much longer though) and find keeping it on the down wind (in side shore) wrist is helpful for managing the wing and a board without a handle on the bottom in the critical moments wading through the break or coming back in. Before I return to the beach I'll switch the leash to the other wrist to prepare a little better for avoiding the carnage I enjoyed in my first surf-outings with a 'ding. Seems to be helping the "hog-tied" in leashes and multiple wing-stab scenario slightly better. Sure gets the adrenaline flowing when your gear yard-sales in the impact zone with leashes braiding themselves around your calves! ;D
6'5" 205 pounds. Armstrong 1850 Foil. Sunova 6'4" Aviator, Starboard Hypernut 7'4", Ozone Wing 5m, Konrad Wingman V2 4m.

Wetstuff

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 2252
    • View Profile
    • Wetstuff
Carib...  Describe Step 1.   How do you carry the weight (pls. describe) out .. what does it weigh?  Years ago I thought about a 'rope tow' for surfing.  (but, the officials got cranky around here when asked...)

Jim
Atlantis Mistress .. Blue Planet MultiTasker ..   Atlantis Venom

Caribsurf

  • Teahupoo Status
  • ******
  • Posts: 1761
    • View Profile
    • Email
It’s actually a small round anchor that collects sand which helps hold it down. I walk out and set it up about 10 ft from shore and about chest deep water so easy to set up. I learned it from a friend when windsurfing in Miami years ago.  I always walk the wing out there 1st and attach it then come back with the foil board.   Ive only done it 3-4 times with a wing, but for years it was my go to for windsurfing.

Ill try and find the anchor and post the link
Hobie Raw 8'10"
Jimmy Lewis Kwad 8'7"
L41 Bruce Wayne 8’10”
Jimmy Lewis Flying V foil SUP 6’11”
Fanatic Sky SUP foil SUP 6’6”
Coreban Rocket 10'6"
Hobie 14' race board

Caribsurf

  • Teahupoo Status
  • ******
  • Posts: 1761
    • View Profile
    • Email
Ok so it’s called a mushroom anchor.
https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/bass-pro-shops-mushroom-anchor

No sharp edges so it’s perfect to use around a wing...
Hobie Raw 8'10"
Jimmy Lewis Kwad 8'7"
L41 Bruce Wayne 8’10”
Jimmy Lewis Flying V foil SUP 6’11”
Fanatic Sky SUP foil SUP 6’6”
Coreban Rocket 10'6"
Hobie 14' race board

VB_Foil

  • Rincon Status
  • ***
  • Posts: 194
    • View Profile
    • @foilgraham Insta
    • Email
My local side shore spot has a jetty that I use to shelter from the waves. Often times I can’t make it back to my launch and need to come in through the shorebreak a bit down the coast. My trick in that scenario is to hunt down the biggest set and follow in behind the last wave. Gun it full speed towards the shore riding high with feet barely in straps. At last second turn slightly upwind and mini jump off the board to parachute into the wind and hope for a soft landing. Then run up the beach out of the impact zone while grabbing the board least with your free hand (trying to keep the foil from acting as an anchor). This worked well for me last time when there were chest to head high waves breaking in a few feet of water on a really high tide, with strong current sucking out. Had I try to prone paddle in I would have been a sitting duck. I did bruise my heel though (rude welcome back to land after floating around for an hour!)

The reel leash works great, as you can really get distance between yourself/wing and the board/foil when needed. I’m always grabbing the reel leash when I wipe out so I can stop or speak up the auto recoil depending on positioning of the board in relation to wind and wing. Also hook my wing leash to the same waist belt and only have fealty with a couple tangles, which really sucked.
I’m a 5’9” 65kg rider:

Boards:
   4'5.5" 33L Armstrong
   4’10” 37L FSM
   5'1" 74L FSM
   5’11” 100L FSM

Foils: Armstrong 800, 1050, 1550, 1850, 2400
Wings: BRM 2M-6M

PonoBill

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 24296
    • View Profile
Rolling around in big shorebreak with a wing and a foil board is a nightmare. A few times I've felt like I was going to drown in ten inches of water.
Foote 10'4X34", SIC 17.5 V1 hollow and an EPS one in Hood River. Foote 9'0" x 31", L41 8'8", 18' Speedboard, etc. etc.

paddlur

  • Rincon Status
  • ***
  • Posts: 136
    • View Profile
Rolling around in big shorebreak with a wing and a foil board is a nightmare. A few times I've felt like I was going to drown in ten inches of water.
Yep it’s amazing how you can beat down by 1-2’ waves with wing and wing board especially short period windswell just relentless.When I get caught inside I find the board leash with handle from kaohileash with dbl coil really helps holding my board as I point it to shore with handle and holding with handle kinda submerging tail of board as white water goes overhead letting wing go so no tangling with board and wing or least try to,but prepare for wing pull on arm and shoulder!!but use best judgment on size of wave to due this ofcoarse.hopefully kaohileash will make a new winging leash with waist strap for winging and couple of other improvements,be even a better leash but that handle incorporated by rail saver is pretty nice,I modified mine to a waist belt style,bottom handle and top/deck strap/webbing handle are great too when you are in standing depth navigating white water
Naish kites-mhl lift foils-GoFoil-ASD surfboards fortaleza brasil,Kalama supfoil.AXIS foils

VB_Foil

  • Rincon Status
  • ***
  • Posts: 194
    • View Profile
    • @foilgraham Insta
    • Email
Also be careful holding on to thin gauge leash loops, spectra ect. in the surf zone.  I know a guy who lost the tip of his index finger holding onto the tail of a SUP that had two leash plugs joined together in the middle to beef up the leash.  I think the board flipped trying to get out past the shorebreak and caught is finger in a loop and pop!
I’m a 5’9” 65kg rider:

Boards:
   4'5.5" 33L Armstrong
   4’10” 37L FSM
   5'1" 74L FSM
   5’11” 100L FSM

Foils: Armstrong 800, 1050, 1550, 1850, 2400
Wings: BRM 2M-6M

Hdip

  • Rincon Status
  • ***
  • Posts: 213
    • View Profile
Special foil leash with a handle at the board end.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CKTQMw_rRow/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

 


SimplePortal 2.3.7 © 2008-2021, SimplePortal