Author Topic: Practical utility of multiple handles  (Read 554 times)

Phils

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Practical utility of multiple handles
« on: September 11, 2020, 05:27:50 AM »
For those who have wings with multiple handles,  do you actually use them often or mostly just use 2 of your favorites?  I only know the Fone so I always use the same 2 handles but sometimes when I am super overpowered on toeside,  I think a more forward placed front handle might be useful. 

I don’t want to mess with a boom.

winged surfer

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Re: Practical utility of multiple handles
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2020, 06:32:59 AM »
I think the trend is to eliminate handles that are not necessary.
I used the new 2021 Cabrinha with 2 longer mini booms handles and they were well placed, plus the mini boom were wide enough to let you adjust while going.
I also tested the new Duotone Unit which has 4 handles but i find the second and the last useless, since i never touched them.
If i’m not wrong Duotone is size 4 and less comes with only 3 handles.

PonoBill

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Re: Practical utility of multiple handles
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2020, 07:12:20 AM »
I have limited experience with multiple handles. I started with duotone and switched to F-one. I still like the boom better so use a fake boom velcroed to the F-one handles. Even with the fake boom I rarely move my hands out of the front and furthest rear handles.

If I need a little more power I slip perhaps two fingers past the handles, front and rear and sometimes move my entire hand to the boom stub past the rear handle, but that's very rare. And during transitions, I often grab the middle of the boom near the front handle. For going upwind, especially unharnessed, the middle of the boom is useful.

But in general, I'm using two handles 99.9% of the time. The value of the boom to me is that it stiffens the connection to the strut hugely. Floppy handles drive me crazy and inevitably give me hand cramps and scrape the skin off my knuckles against the strut stitching. I tried just reinforcing the handles with external carbon half-tubes to stiffen them, but the fake boom does that so much better that it's worth the two minutes it takes to attach it. It also holds the harness lines more stiffly and keeps them from flapping in my face during pumping. I probably gain back that two minutes by not having to rig harness lines to each wing.

DW is right about harness lines. Having them makes going upwind much easier and less of a shoulder strain.
Foote 10'4X34", SIC 17.5 V1 hollow and an EPS one in Hood River. Foote 9'0" x 31", L41 8'8", 18' Speedboard, etc. etc.

Mike dubs

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Re: Practical utility of multiple handles
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2020, 07:15:51 AM »
I have 3 long handles on my Ensis 6&4.5 and 2 long ones on my 3.5, easy to slide hands for relevant sweet spot. I also use harness lines, nice rest, good for overpowered and allowed you to change grip easy.
Mike

VB_Foil

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Re: Practical utility of multiple handles
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2020, 07:23:13 AM »
Two handles on the BRM W1s are perfect.  Came from the Swings. 
I’m a 5’9” 65kg rider:

Boards:
   4'5.5" 33L Armstrong
   4’10” 37L FSM
   5'1" 74L FSM
   5’11” 100L FSM

Foils: Armstrong 800, 1050, 1550, 1850, 2400
Wings: BRM 2M-6M

Dwight (DW)

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Re: Practical utility of multiple handles
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2020, 07:35:20 AM »
Just sit back and wait on the next generation wings.

It is mind blowing how “freeing” and instinctively you place your hands with a boom, ALL OVER It.

The day will come when shorter booms, says 3 feet, maybe 4 feet, allow this freedom, and change your world. All at the same weight as current light handle wing models.

Think about this. A 3 to 4 foot length of SUP paddle shaft is similar weight to 3 or 4 wet webbing handles stuffed with foam in my opinion.

You’ll never go back to the restrictive limitations of handles.

Weight is why handles won the early battle. But they will lose out as designs get smarter.

Never going back to handles.


Wetstuff

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Re: Practical utility of multiple handles
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2020, 08:14:41 AM »
It may be 'person-specific'* but I heard of a carpal tunnel issue with the BRM from a guy in HI.

Jim

*... 'preexisting condition, anatomy?
Atlantis Mistress .. Blue Planet MultiTasker ..   Atlantis Venom

PonoBill

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Re: Practical utility of multiple handles
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2020, 09:35:35 AM »
I think you nailed it Wetstuff--pre-existing condition revealed by unusual use causing inflammation.

A strong grip can cause or exacerbate carpal tunnel syndrome. If the guy was just hanging on too hard it wouldn't matter what wing he was using, it would flare up. I've beaten the living shit out of my hands and developed the syndrome, but it took years to progress. It went from minor irritation to sleepless nights when I used an electric jackhammer to remove huge concrete machinery footings in my shop--and it didn't get better. Once the issue is present an initiating activity can cause inflammation that is self-sustaining. I had surgery on both hands and it worked extremely well, despite my doctor giving me a poor prognosis for the surgery. He said I probably had the syndrome for at least twenty years given the muscular changes he saw, and all my broken fingers over the last 50 years of foolishness and other injuries weren't helping. My doctor was shocked at the success and recovery of muscular strength in my thumbs, which apparently is unusual. Sometimes it's better to be lucky than smart.

One of the reasons I like my fake boom is that I don't have to close my fingers over a floppy, skinny handle--I can leave my hands open and still hold on. There's an optimal diameter for gripping--too small and you have to close your fingers around it, too big and you have to apply too much finger pressure. Every tool guy (and gal) has favorite screwdrivers and that's usually a function of grip. I used to strip the boom grip off my windsurfing booms because it made my hands hurt--probably because I had carpal tunnel syndrome way back in the late 80's. I doubt the problem is specific to BRM. In fact, their handles seem to make a serious effort to be ergonomic. I doubt they are as good as a proper diameter boom, but at least the wrist angle seems right.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2020, 09:52:01 AM by PonoBill »
Foote 10'4X34", SIC 17.5 V1 hollow and an EPS one in Hood River. Foote 9'0" x 31", L41 8'8", 18' Speedboard, etc. etc.

 


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