Author Topic: Do you use glass for pinholes?  (Read 575 times)

Bulky

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Do you use glass for pinholes?
« on: June 01, 2020, 11:37:24 AM »
Let me start with a happy tangent:  My kids have caught the bug.  Took about 7 years of me amassing boards and finally this summer, they want to go surf.  Instead of needing to figure out when I can get a hall pass for a session, I now get texts asking if I can leave work early so we can catch some waves before dinner.  Very happy!   ;D ;D ;D

My son has quickly shredded on past me but has a nasty habit of riding waves all the way to the sand.  He thought I was just being lame dad when I pointed out that this wasn't a great idea but now there are about a half dozen pinhole leaks on the bottom of the board.  Not a major challenge to fix, but wondering if it's necessary to cut tiny glass patches for all of them and fix them as I do a typical ding.  Not opposed to it, but thought I'd ask as I have a habit of making things more complicated than they need to be.  Some of them are so small you can't even see them with the naked eye--you only know they're there because of little water bubbling out and a few salt crystals after that.

Would just a quick sand and brushing resin do the trick?  Thought I'd ask.
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The Kernel

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Re: Do you use glass for pinholes?
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2020, 12:56:47 PM »
Bulky:

That's awesome your kids have gotten the stoke!  Your idea could work just fine and I've done that too. 

In general, I've been pretty aggressive at laying extra glass and resin in those types of situations.  If it's a board that gets subjected to those conditions, I like to reinforce the area that has been most scraped AND mitigate future damage.  This of course means the board will take on some extra weight--just de minimis in my view; some guys might be aghast at adding a few grams.

Sounds also like an opportunity for your son to learn some repair techniques, even if it's just observing the process.  I had a buddy do likewise with his own son and it was quite enlightening and empowering for the young man.
Kernel:  Cutting through the bull**it.
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PonoBill

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Re: Do you use glass for pinholes?
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2020, 02:11:51 PM »
There are a couple of lighter ways to close pinholes. If there's only a few of them and you don't mind the look, then a little square of aluminum tape burnished flat and tight with a credit card is 100 percent water tight and adds no weight. If the holes are as small as you state, putting the board in the sun a while, then cleaning the bottom well, sanding lightly, brushing on some epoxy, and putting the board in shade or a cool room will pull the epoxy into the holes. Just make sure the epoxy winds up evenly flowed onto the surface after the epoxy gets sucked in.

If there are a lot of pinholes in a larger area then I might put on a layer of glass, but you need to sand all the paint off to do that.
Foote 10'4X34", SIC 17.5 V1 hollow and an EPS one in Hood River. Foote 9'0" x 31", L41 8'8", 18' Speedboard, etc. etc.

GRVN

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Re: Do you use glass for pinholes?
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2020, 09:33:14 AM »
To add to what bill said I sometimes cut my epoxy with xylene to get into small holes.

The Kernel

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Re: Do you use glass for pinholes?
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2020, 08:44:40 AM »
"...If the holes are as small as you state, putting the board in the sun a while, then cleaning the bottom well, sanding lightly, brushing on some epoxy, and putting the board in shade or a cool room will pull the epoxy into the holes. "

Brilliant!  Never have considered using thermal variation to help pull epoxy into a board as it contracts while cooling.  Adding to my list of tricks....Thanks Bill! 
Kernel:  Cutting through the bull**it.
"This is the kernel of the argument."

Over 50, but usually pushing it like I'm 25 and paying for it later.

9'2" T. Patterson / Riviera
9'2" Riviera Nugg Turbo Carbon
10' Riviera Machete

TallDude

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Re: Do you use glass for pinholes?
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2020, 10:27:10 AM »
To add to what bill said I sometimes cut my epoxy with xylene to get into small holes.
I always keep a bunch of xylene laying around in my shop. So many uses. It's edging out my old stock of chlordane for killing pests ::)
It's not overhead to me!
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PonoBill

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Re: Do you use glass for pinholes?
« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2020, 02:29:35 PM »
To add to what bill said I sometimes cut my epoxy with xylene to get into small holes.
I always keep a bunch of xylene laying around in my shop. So many uses. It's edging out my old stock of chlordane for killing pests ::)

Yeah, Xylene is kind of nasty: "Breathing xylene vapors in small amounts can cause headache, dizziness, drowsiness, and nausea. With more serious exposure, xylene can cause sleepiness, stumbling, irregular heartbeat, fainting, or even death." Then there's the whole "it might cause cancer but we don't have enough information to say". Welcome to the new, improved EPA which apparently is an abbreviation for "we no longer give a shit about the environment."

  We have an odd relationship with toxic chemicals in the USA. Chlordane is one of the many environmental disasters in a drum that are still legal to manufacture in the USA, but not to use--except for killing fire ants, which apparently is a lot more important than having a chemical that stays toxic for 20+ years being sprayed around willy-nilly. Fortunately no one is making Chlodane-based fire ant spray here--probably because of that whole "sue your ass into the ground" thing that only Monsanto and Bayer seem to be willing to deal with. Bayer, or course, might be rethinking their 63 billion bucks acquisition of Monsanto since the Roundup damages might be somewhere between huge and infinite.

We can blame Bayer (and Shell) for Neonics and similar pesticides that kill bees wholesale. They and Dow are fighting bans and regulations fiercely while the population of bees continue to shrink. Sometimes you just have to wonder if these guys live on the same planet we do. The EU generally bans neonictinides but Bayer sells millions of tons of the stuff every else, including the USA. They claim the effect on honeybees is negligible and the 30% decline in populations is just coincidence, kind of like cigarettes. Oddly everyone agrees they kill bumblebees, and if you're wondering why you never see any these days when they used to be common (and were extremely effective pollinators) look not further.

In the meantime I'm hoping to have a beehive survive this year after three years in a row of both my hives dying. Something that never happened to me before.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2020, 02:51:11 PM by PonoBill »
Foote 10'4X34", SIC 17.5 V1 hollow and an EPS one in Hood River. Foote 9'0" x 31", L41 8'8", 18' Speedboard, etc. etc.

 


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