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Author Topic: Surfboards (Longboards)  (Read 20378 times)

Night Wing

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Re: Surfboards (Longboards)
« Reply #120 on: July 24, 2021, 07:27:08 AM »
Sometimes the smallest detail makes the biggest difference. Continuing on.

I was told when I visited Surfside, before I got all my cork pieces to make my Parallax waxless, to visit a local surfer/shaper who owns a surf shop in Surfside, Texas and where he also has a CNC machine to make his customized boards.

When I visited him and let him look at the pictures of my 9.0 (9") Involvement fin installed in my Parallax, he told me concerning single fin surfboards, I was correct in thinking I should have one-third of the fin hanging over the edge of the rail.

But he told me when I installed the fin, I "eye balled" it and this is how I got my 1 1/2" distance from the front of the fin to the front of the long fin box. He told me, from looking at the pictures of my installed fin, my Parallax did not have one third of the fin overhanging the rail. I had "much less" than one third. This would make my Parallax very loose since there wasn't one third of the fin over the rail.

He told the first time I would try to turn my board left or right, the fin where I had it placed would would turn the board so tightly and combined with the very fast speed the Parallax generates by design, I would be thrown off the board because of the speed in the tight turn. He gave me detailed instructions.

He told me to get a ruler and measure where the fin would come out the fin box into thirds. In this case by laying the fin flat and where it would come out of the fin box and go straight up 6" and put a dot at the front of the fin, do the same thing with the back of the fin and also in the middle of the fin. Then draw a horizontal line (in pencil) through all three dots.

Then place the fin in the fin box and slide the back of the fin at the 6" line to where it met the edge of the rail. Then tighten the fin down since this would really give me 3" of the fin overhanging the rail instead of "eye balling it". I followed his instructions and found the 9.0 (9") fin had 3" of fin overhanging the rail.

Then I measured with a ruler, the front of the fin where it was tightened down to the front of the fin box and the distance was 3 3/16". A very big change from 1 1/2" from where I had "eye balled" it.

I did the same thing with my 9.5 (9 1/2") Involvement fin. But dividing a 9 1/2" fin into thirds, I had to improvise. The ruler I have is divided (english measurements, not metric) in one inch (1") segments by sixteenths of an inch, eighths of an inch, quarter of an inch and one half inch.

So 9 1/2" inches divided into thirds is 3 3/16" + 3 3/16" + 3 3/16" equals 9 9/16", but 9 8/16" is 9 1/2" so I would be off by 1/16". So I measured the fin, like I did with my first 9" fin and placed the dots at the front, back and middle of fin set at 6 5/16". So when the back of the fin met the horizontal line where it met the rail, this left me 3 3/16" of the fin overhanging the rail. In essence, one third of the fin overhanging the rail.

I then measured this distance; with a ruler and found where the 9.5 fin was tightened down in the fin box, to the front of the fin box, the distance was 2 1/2". This is a very good and detailed way to get a good starting point to place a fin in a single fin prone longboard if one wants to have one third of the fin overhanging the rail.

He also told me whatever Involvement fin (9.0 or 9.5) I had installed in my board, depending on the wave conditions I actually had at that time instead of what was "forecasted" to always take the second fin with me as a backup along a ruler and flat head screw driver and I would not run into any problems fin wise.





 
Blue Planet Duke: 10'5" x 32" x 4.5" @ 190 Liters (2 Dukes)
Sup Sports Hammer: 8'11" x 31" x 4" @ 140 Liters
SUP Sports One World: 11'1" x 30" x 4.5" @ 173 Liters
CJ Nelson Parallax: 9'3" x 23 1/2" x 3 3/16" @ 78.8 Liters (prone surfing longboard)

surfcowboy

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Re: Surfboards (Longboards)
« Reply #121 on: July 24, 2021, 08:50:40 AM »
Enjoying watching your process. But be glad youíre not in a place like SoCal where there are dozens of shapers. Every shaper will tell you something different and youíd go crazy from the conflicting info lol. Even more fun? Get two, experienced shapers who disagree into a room and try to figure out what to do. haha.

Everyone remember to pay attention and do what feels good. Others can give you a starting point but in the end we do whatís right for us.


This thread shows that really well. Thanks for publicly laying out what youíve learned and how your approach has morphed.

By the way, re: nose traction. Youíre  not paddling lying on the nose so you can use cheaper and simpler (and lighter)  traction on the nose as was suggested. One of my mid lengths has the spray traction on the nose. It would chew my belly up but itís where I donít lie. Works great, cheap, and mostly invisible. Save the expeiand heavy stuff for where you lie down. I hate wax too. Glad to be foiling and done with it mostly.

Night Wing

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Re: Surfboards (Longboards)
« Reply #122 on: July 24, 2021, 12:01:02 PM »
@ surfcowboy

I did make one mistake in my last post and it concerns this quote below:

"Then place the fin in the fin box and slide the back of the fin at the 6" line to where it met the edge of the rail."

What I should have said was not to place the fin in the fin box, but lay it flat on the board where the fin fits into the fin box and then slide the fin, while it is still laying flat on the board, until the 6" horizontal line at the back of the 9" fin meets the edge of the board's rail. I did the same thing with the 9 1/2" fin.

BTW, the reason why I chose the Flying Diamonds fin designs is because CJ Nelson who designed his Parallax surfboard and had it shaped by Ryan Engle, wanted a fin that went well with the Parallax. If I'm not mistaken, CJ designed his own fins for his boards. I'm not sure, but I think CJ Nelson is either a part owner or sole owner of the Flying Diamonds fin company.

I know some people like a looser board feeling and some of them use the Parallax fin which is a lot looser fin and CJ's fastest fin than the Involvement fin in their Parallax boards whereas I wanted more drive in my Parallax board and this is why I chose the Involvement fin.

The CJ Nelson designs of his fins are at the link below.

https://flyingdiamondsca.com/fin-collections/cj-nelson-fins/
Blue Planet Duke: 10'5" x 32" x 4.5" @ 190 Liters (2 Dukes)
Sup Sports Hammer: 8'11" x 31" x 4" @ 140 Liters
SUP Sports One World: 11'1" x 30" x 4.5" @ 173 Liters
CJ Nelson Parallax: 9'3" x 23 1/2" x 3 3/16" @ 78.8 Liters (prone surfing longboard)

Night Wing

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Re: Surfboards (Longboards)
« Reply #123 on: August 25, 2021, 07:53:32 AM »
It's been a little over a month since my last post in this topic thread. I waited until I had three sessions down at Surfside, Texas which is my favorite place to prone surf a longboard.

I took both Involvement fins with me (9.0 & 9.5). The 9.0 fin was set 3 3/16" down from the front of the center fin box and the 9.5 fin was set at 2 1/2" down from the front of the center fin box. And I always take a screwdriver and a 12" ruler with me.

The Surfside Jetty is about 1/2 mile in length. I like to surf from about 1/4 mile from the beach which on this day let me ride the board all the way to the beach.

The first session was when the wind direction was from the south/southwest at about 15 mph. The wave direction that day was from the southeast with wave heights around 4'. The time between waves was around 10 seconds. The culmination of these factors produced some really nice uniform waves which stayed together and which I could ride all the way to the beach.

My 9'3" Parallax is a niche board since I can trim (steer) the board from the middle of the board if I wanted to go right or left just by shifting my weight from right to left instead of standing on the tail end of the board over the fin, doing the back drop with one foot and then shifting my weight to the right or left to go right or left direction wise.

The board is also a speed machine. I could easily outrun the wave so I had to take some big sweeping turns to stay in contact with the wave so I never made any fin adjustments placement wise for either of the 9.0 or 9.5 fins since the board was performing the way I wanted it to with both fins.

The next session I want to talk about was a day where the wind direction was coming from the south at about 22 mph. The wave direction that day was from the south also. The waves were about 5 1/2' - 6'. The time between each wave was around 5 seconds. These factors produced wind blown disorganized waves.

The Parallax again tried to outrun these waves. With the 9.0 fin set at 3 3/16" down from the front of the center fin box, with board really moving fast, the tail end of the board wanted to "skid out" sometimes. Too loose. So I moved the fin back to where it was 3 11/16" from the front of the center fin box to give the board better traction in a fast turn and the tail end of the board no longer wanted to skid out.

The 9.5 fin, I didn't have to change the setting since it performed well in these bigger wind and wave conditions with the initial setting of 2 1/2" down from the center of the fin box.

The last session was in small wave conditions. The wind direction was from the south at about 10 mph. The wave direction was from the south. The small disorganized waves were around 1.5' - 2' in height with the time between each wave around 3 seconds.

The 9.0 fin handles these small waves easily with the 3 3/16 placement setting down from the front of the center fin box. However, the 9.5 fin didn't really like these small waves. Too tracky and made it feel harder to turn from the middle of the board. I had to move this fin forward, to loosen up the board and the sweet spot fin placement wise was only 2" down from the front of the center fin box and the board was easy to turn from the middle of the board again.

As for the "cork grip", I'll review that in the next post because if I try and do it in this post, this post is going to turn into a "long manuscript".

Blue Planet Duke: 10'5" x 32" x 4.5" @ 190 Liters (2 Dukes)
Sup Sports Hammer: 8'11" x 31" x 4" @ 140 Liters
SUP Sports One World: 11'1" x 30" x 4.5" @ 173 Liters
CJ Nelson Parallax: 9'3" x 23 1/2" x 3 3/16" @ 78.8 Liters (prone surfing longboard)

Night Wing

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Re: Surfboards (Longboards)
« Reply #124 on: August 25, 2021, 08:33:39 AM »
Now for the "cork grip" review.

As stated previously, I really do not like to use wax on either of my surfboard or sups. Too messy since Texas is hot and when it gets hot here in Texas, it is hot. Melted wax gets all over everything when it is hot. Clothes, skin, seats, etc. This is why I wanted an alternative to "wax".

One cannot slide on the cork material. The grip is definitely there. One has to lift their feet to move around. The cork does not rub the bottoms of my feet raw when I'm moving around on top of the board. The cork does not rub my knees raw either when I do my popup from the prone position to catch a wave.

Basically, the only exposed skin on me when I was surfing my Parallax, it is from the knees on down to my feet since I wear a long sleeve t-shirt and a long billed hat which covers my face and nose. The hat also has ear flaps and a semi wrap around flap in the back of the hat which covers the entire back of my neck. The only sunblock I use is on my exposed skin which is from the knees on down to my feet.

I'm telling you this since I do not wear a wetsuit since I don't like cold water so I do not know if the cork material will damage the neoprene on a wetsuit due to rubbing. Once the water temperature goes below 66 degrees F, I place myself in dry dock so to speak. And when the water temperature reaches 66 degree F (and above), I'm back on the water.

Durability, is the unknown factor right now. I don't know how long the cork material will last. But right now, I really like not having to deal with applying a base coat of wax, then applying a different wax for the temperature of the water and finally, the melted wax mess.

BTW; as I type this post, the water temperature at Surfside Jetty Park is 88 degrees F.
Blue Planet Duke: 10'5" x 32" x 4.5" @ 190 Liters (2 Dukes)
Sup Sports Hammer: 8'11" x 31" x 4" @ 140 Liters
SUP Sports One World: 11'1" x 30" x 4.5" @ 173 Liters
CJ Nelson Parallax: 9'3" x 23 1/2" x 3 3/16" @ 78.8 Liters (prone surfing longboard)

surfinJ

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Re: Surfboards (Longboards)
« Reply #125 on: August 25, 2021, 10:18:15 AM »
Nice stories. A new board is always a treat. A perfect board for the summer too.

 


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