Author Topic: Risks Involved In Learning Wing Foiling???  (Read 1318 times)

SimonP

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Re: Risks Involved In Learning Wing Foiling???
« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2020, 02:40:53 PM »
The one that worries me is breaking a board leash. A foil board pointing downwind takes off at a great rate of knots.
Has anyone done a long swim in with a wing? Does it hinder or help?

Caribsurf

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Re: Risks Involved In Learning Wing Foiling???
« Reply #16 on: March 18, 2020, 03:03:05 PM »
Hey Simon that has worried me as well, especially when  I am wing foiling far out at sea like I do.  Thankfully, I have learned pretty quickly and keeping crashes to a minimum.  Still i am afraid the foil might cut the leash and zoom, the foil board takes off.  I have worked out in my mind how I would get in if I could not catch up with the board and it's not a pretty picture, but imagine I could make it shore laying on the wing breast stroking.
I also worry about the wing leash snapping, but at least you could paddle in on the board.

When I was learning to foil behind the jet ski, there was no leash and I remember after crashing the driver having to speed up and coral the foil board using the tow rope. 
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PonoBill

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Re: Risks Involved In Learning Wing Foiling???
« Reply #17 on: March 20, 2020, 10:04:01 AM »
I have indeed, lost my board. My leash didn't break--I forgot to attach it. Early days learning to get up and try to fly in the park just east of The Dalles. I sprinted for it, but it got away and it was clear I wasn't going to catch it. So I struck out for shore thinking I could run along the shore faster than I could swim with an impact vest on. After a few minutes of slow chugging, I decided to try a self-rescue with the wing. I got it flying over my head and then slid my lower hand down the boom. In short order, I was moving fast enough to leave a wake and i could steer easily by angling the wing. I briefly considered chasing the board down with my powered-up speed, but it was too far away to be sure of an effective chase. I ran down the bank, caught the board about half a mile away, and had the great pleasure of a long walk of shame.

I've also lost my wing. I know, right? What a moron! On the plus side, I haven't lost my boardshorts yet, though I have had them yanked off. One more good reason to wear a leash.

In all cases, I've found the impact vest and it's enhanced float to be extremely valuable. I doubt I could have flown the wing over my head as easily without added buoyancy. So of course I've recently taken to not wearing it. Good thing I wrote this, earth to Bill, wear your fucking vest.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2020, 10:07:34 AM by PonoBill »
Foote 10'4X34", SIC 17.5 V1 hollow and an EPS one in Hood River. Foote 9'0" x 31", L41 8'8", 18' Speedboard, etc. etc.

Admin

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Re: Risks Involved In Learning Wing Foiling???
« Reply #18 on: March 20, 2020, 10:22:53 AM »
The one that worries me is breaking a board leash. A foil board pointing downwind takes off at a great rate of knots.
Has anyone done a long swim in with a wing? Does it hinder or help?

I broke a leash and lost my board last year in the Gorge.  The wing helped a lot.  It is easy to fly it partially from the water and sail/kick back to shore.  We always get some variety of side shore wind, though.  Offshore (or no wind) would be a swim.

clay

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Re: Risks Involved In Learning Wing Foiling???
« Reply #19 on: March 20, 2020, 12:08:06 PM »
Getting in and out can be the most challenging part of winging, trying to hold a wing in one hand and a foil board in the other while navigating shore pound.  Maybe the bottom handle solves this?

Injuries I know of are falling and getting hit in the back or side of the head with the main wing requiring stitches, full helmet protects from this.

The other injury is roll falling from full height and landing on the rail of board, broken ribs, broken leg.  I had 2 deep leg bruises and bruised ribs.  Impact vest saved my ribs.  Leg padding might need a custom solution, maybe adding more pads to the Patagonia impact suit, or stuffing pads into a wetsuit?  There are kids float vests that have thick removable foam, might be good source to hack an impact suit together...

Smooth protected waters makes everything easier and safer.
Aloha, I welcome and appreciate all responses of positivity and good feeling.

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PonoBill

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Re: Risks Involved In Learning Wing Foiling???
« Reply #20 on: March 20, 2020, 12:40:06 PM »
I bought one of the Patagonia impact suits. You crawl in from the neck. Talk about a suit that demands a zipper. I got it on after a long and ridiculous struggle but there was simply no way I could get it off without a knife--which is what I did.

For the most part, an impact vest that doesn't impede you but that protects stomach and ribs, as well as chest, will help with 90 percent of the fuckups. Getting in and out of the water with shorebreak requires technique, confidence, and speed. I think I'm pretty good at it now, but I got rolled up the beach by a wave recently. A bottom handle would definitely help, I don't have one but I might change that soon. Using a deck handle generally implies having the board on one side of you and the foil on the other with the mast either in front of or behind your legs. I generally go for in front with the board facing backward, knowing I can time the shorebreak and lift the board and foil over the whitewater coming in, and time and scramble coming out. With the mast in front, you're generally in good shape coming out of the water, though if you get caught by a wave the board can pivot in front of you and trip you while it scoops you up with the foil. At the same time, the wing gets caught in the whitewater and tried to pull you back out. Never a pretty sight. A determined rush up the beach is the best defense. I generally hold the front wing handle in the same had that's in the deck handle. When everything goes to shit I let go of the wing and let it fend for itself at the end of the leash. As long as your beach doesn't have pointy things and you keep the foil away from it the wing will be OK.

Helmets are up to you. I generally don't use them but I think it's a good idea. Yeah, that sounds as stupid as it is.
Foote 10'4X34", SIC 17.5 V1 hollow and an EPS one in Hood River. Foote 9'0" x 31", L41 8'8", 18' Speedboard, etc. etc.