Author Topic: Fanatic Strike - Carbon vs BXF?  (Read 762 times)

Ripple

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Fanatic Strike - Carbon vs BXF?
« on: March 09, 2020, 12:10:04 AM »
Iím looking into getting a 25Ē fanatic strike, there is a large difference in price but less than a kg difference in weight between CCS carbon and BXF construction so Iím wondering what are the other downsides of the cheaper version as to me weight only would not justify the extra cost? Dos Anybody have any deeper insight on this over and above what the fanatic website says? The bxf seems to also have a carbon layer so Iím wondering if itís that different?

JimK

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Re: Fanatic Strike - Carbon vs BXF?
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2020, 10:54:49 AM »
Ripple,

The STRIKE is a GREAT board. The construction question is basically 2 fold
1) How heavy you are?
2) Are you intending to (Primarily) race this and at what level of competition?

Lastly where you are and some insight in conditions might help

For faster response PM me

JimK
Extreme Windsurfing

eDUBs

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Re: Fanatic Strike - Carbon vs BXF?
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2020, 11:15:54 AM »
lets do a comparison

ccs:

1. light finish and weight saving
2.ultra light glass layer
3.full carbon kevlar layer
4.ud carbon rail reinforcment
5.carbon stance force patch
6.high density pvs sandwich (standing area)
7carbon stance reinforcement patch
8ultra light fibre area
9. super light cnc eps core

Bxf;
1. light finish and weight savings graphics
2.ultra light ud glass layer
3reinforcement rail band
4 extra strong wood veneer (stance area)
5. 45 degree biax fibre layer
6.90 degree glass fibre area
7light fibre layer
8super light eps core

we know number 1 on both the same they just added graphics to the bxf wording.
we also know that number 2 on both are the same they just added UD on the bxf which means uni direction, so basically its the same as the CCS.
So number 3 on the ccs seems to be the same only difference is the ccs is carbon and the bxf is most likley fiberglass. number 4 on the ccs is the same as number 3 on the bxf. number 5 on the ccs is the same as number 4 on the bxf only difference is carbon on the standing area and the bxf gets wood veneer. looks like 5,6,7 on the ccs are focusing on the standing area adding pvc and carbon whereas the bxf is wood veneer and and glass. 7 and 8 are the same thing for both. looks like the added some degree fibre angles to the bxf to just add more.


« Last Edit: March 12, 2020, 11:21:39 AM by eDUBs »

JimK

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Re: Fanatic Strike - Carbon vs BXF?
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2020, 05:45:17 AM »
eDub,

OK that was a nice layup comparison but how do they perform different?

IMHO
(Since I've ridden both..practically side by side)
The Carbon is obviously lighter (racing carrying to the water) Carbon also felt more acceleration (Livelier) and buoy turns were faster
The BXF is a durable construction of an excellent shape but feels more like a tuned up turning board (compared to a Fanatic Ray) Lastly I guess it comes down to application (what you are using it for/Paddler size/ability) and cost

I asked questions of the original poster but got no response...So I'm kinda in a holding pattern detail wise

JimK
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eDUBs

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Re: Fanatic Strike - Carbon vs BXF?
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2020, 10:02:17 AM »
I donít think I am sold based on the weight - the CCS weights are listed as  11.85 KG and the BXF weight is 12.10 kg. You wonít really notice the .25KG. Based on my experiences from board repair, those number are probably close but not accurate considering the manufacturers use lots of fillers to hide lots of small problems etc. board could of felt heavier to if the deck pad was holding more water. Lots of small variables to notice a weight difference.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2020, 10:04:36 AM by eDUBs »

Ripple

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Re: Fanatic Strike - Carbon vs BXF?
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2020, 04:20:50 AM »
Hi there, apologies for going quiet, I did not receive any notification of the responses so I though my post hadn't generated any interest and went sup surfing instead. :-)

Thanks for all the replies. To give a little more context, I am 78kg, I am after a board to train in flat water or small/short period wind chop in a bay, upwind then downwind or the other way round. My current DW boards pitch a lot even with tiny ripples and the nose gets pushed left and right by the wind, making the upwind leg very unpleasant. I've demoed other boards more oriented towards flat water paddling, a 25" fanatic strike carbon, a 26" SIC RS and a 25" one edge 2.0. They are all great boards and do what I need them to do brilliantly, but I like the fanatic a little more as it seems a little more stable and also slices well through chop even when it gets bigger.

I could only test the carbon strike so I would not want to take the risk of buying a BXF version and finding out that it performs differently, not so well as the carbon did. I won't be racing the board so weight is not an issue (the difference is irrelevant anyway), but if rigidity affects the response to pitching in chop then it would make a difference to me. Price wise, I can buy either a used carbon or a new BXF.

Resistance to impacts is also important to me, so if either one or the other is less prone to dent or crack on paddle impacts it would steer my choice too.

Jacko

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Re: Fanatic Strike - Carbon vs BXF?
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2020, 06:43:30 PM »
Hi there, apologies for going quiet, I did not receive any notification of the responses so I though my post hadn't generated any interest and went sup surfing instead. :-)

Thanks for all the replies. To give a little more context, I am 78kg, I am after a board to train in flat water or small/short period wind chop in a bay, upwind then downwind or the other way round. My current DW boards pitch a lot even with tiny ripples and the nose gets pushed left and right by the wind, making the upwind leg very unpleasant. I've demoed other boards more oriented towards flat water paddling, a 25" fanatic strike carbon, a 26" SIC RS and a 25" one edge 2.0. They are all great boards and do what I need them to do brilliantly, but I like the fanatic a little more as it seems a little more stable and also slices well through chop even when it gets bigger.

I could only test the carbon strike so I would not want to take the risk of buying a BXF version and finding out that it performs differently, not so well as the carbon did. I won't be racing the board so weight is not an issue (the difference is irrelevant anyway), but if rigidity affects the response to pitching in chop then it would make a difference to me. Price wise, I can buy either a used carbon or a new BXF.

Resistance to impacts is also important to me, so if either one or the other is less prone to dent or crack on paddle impacts it would steer my choice too.

From what it sounds like you should test the Edge Pro 2.0 from ONE there is a new 14 x 25.5 coming out in this new shape and that board does exactly what you are wanting plus it comes in Hollow!! The Edge 2.0 flat deck is a great board and still holds it own against current boards just made from most but is still now 2 years old. Edge Pro  2.0  is unreal and if you don't mind dugouts might be a option if and when the stocks become available. https://www.oneoceansports.com/edge-pro

eDUBs

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Re: Fanatic Strike - Carbon vs BXF?
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2020, 06:57:46 PM »


Resistance to impacts is also important to me, so if either one or the other is less prone to dent or crack on paddle impacts it would steer my choice too.


Fiberglass beats carbon fiber for durability ďtoughnessĒ because of the flexing properties it has.