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Author Topic: Axis Foils  (Read 229976 times)

Admin

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #435 on: October 07, 2020, 11:06:17 AM »
Sano, have you tried the Axis carbon masts?

Califoilia

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #436 on: October 07, 2020, 11:20:05 AM »
Yeah, some guy here at the Zone sold me his 760, 900/390 setup at a nice price so I could give it a try. ;) :D
Me: 6'1"/185...5'1" Kings Foil Board...5'7" Kings Foil Board...9'6" Bob Pearson "Laird Noserider"...14' Lahui Kai "Manta"...8'0" WaveStorm if/when the proning urges still hit.

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #437 on: October 07, 2020, 11:24:30 AM »
Yeah, some guy here at the Zone sold me his 760, 900/390 setup at a nice price so I could give it a try. ;) :D

I wondered where that stuff went :)

Califoilia

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #438 on: October 07, 2020, 12:02:25 PM »
Lol... ;D

So in order of torsional "flexiness", I found/felt that the Go Foil later versions had the least, followed by the Armstrong and Axis that were similar...with the Axis just slightly more flexy than the Armstrong (from what I remember in my limited time on the Armstrong).

Armstrong advertises this flexiness as being something good....
Quote
The unique quad c beam core layup delivers a mast with smooth consistent reactive flex, generating sweet handling response and better stability by smoothing out bumps and flexing precisely to drive you through turns.
...but I sure as heck didn't like the feel of it, and I think that's why I really like the Axis (aluminum) from the very first time I rode it. Because it just felt so much more solid, responsive, and predicable compared to the flexiness of the GF stuff I'd come off of.

Now granted, I never really felt or understood the flexiness of the GF stuff until I jumped on the Axis as the first aluminum mast I'd tried (with the exception of the Slingshot that I initially had starting out, but never did get flying properly with it before getting the GF stuff about 6 weeks later), so I never tried to (or knew I needed to) load and unload the mast to get it through a turn like Hdip did (or does).

This IMO is why going from what I feel is a "very responsive" aluminum mast back to a CF one, I immediately noticed that torsional flex as a slight delay in the wing turning with the board immediately (as it "loaded up" apparently), and then the unloading of it I could also feel as I guess it "released" and transitioned into the board under me that felt like a little bobble underfoot. :(
Me: 6'1"/185...5'1" Kings Foil Board...5'7" Kings Foil Board...9'6" Bob Pearson "Laird Noserider"...14' Lahui Kai "Manta"...8'0" WaveStorm if/when the proning urges still hit.

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #439 on: October 08, 2020, 03:06:40 AM »
Sano, we are good examples of how much preference is involved in this stuff.  I am sure that familiarity with what we have been using plays a role as well.

I have hit that point where I am super happy with my underwater kit now.  Chan and I have only two front wings (760, 860) and two tails (both 390's).  We keep those mounted and always use the 960 masts.  I love both setups and I don't care which I use so we often switch off.  Those two wings are very similar in size. 

I love gear and I am always stoked to see new stuff come along but I can use the 860 kit for every wind situation.  That makes it too easy and too pleasant.  The 860 isn't quite as quick as the 760 but it is a perfect speed for my size to allow slowing down without stall to match our swell speed and when it accelerates it has enough headroom not to overfoil, even on big drops.  It is really easy to place at the right depth. 

Califoilia

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #440 on: October 08, 2020, 07:33:34 AM »
Sano, we are good examples of how much preference is involved in this stuff.  I am sure that familiarity with what we have been using plays a role as well.
Oh most definitely, just mentioned the same to a buddy of mine just last week on how different riding styles (or even goals maybe) changes somebody's gear preference. Not to mention how you, and I are doing two different foil sports for that matter (surf foiling vs wing foiling), so it makes sense that we'd have different foil preferences in the gear we use.

Quote
I have hit that point where I am super happy with my underwater kit now.  Chan and I have only two front wings (760, 860) and two tails (both 390's).  We keep those mounted and always use the 960 masts.  I love both setups and I don't care which I use so we often switch off.  Those two wings are very similar in size. 

I love gear and I am always stoked to see new stuff come along but I can use the 860 kit for every wind situation.  That makes it too easy and too pleasant.  The 860 isn't quite as quick as the 760 but it is a perfect speed for my size to allow slowing down without stall to match our swell speed and when it accelerates it has enough headroom not to overfoil, even on big drops.  It is really easy to place at the right depth.
This makes sense. Due to the fact that your foil energy is found more above the water in the wind, whereas my foil energy is all below the water in the strength and size of the swell. So I'm typically getting out of the water...when it gets windy enough for you to start heading into it. :)

So it's understandable that you have a quiver of "wings" for the wind conditions above the water to harness its energy, where as I have a quiver of wings for below the water to account for the changing conditions below it.
Me: 6'1"/185...5'1" Kings Foil Board...5'7" Kings Foil Board...9'6" Bob Pearson "Laird Noserider"...14' Lahui Kai "Manta"...8'0" WaveStorm if/when the proning urges still hit.

Aaron SUP

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #441 on: October 14, 2020, 01:11:15 AM »
Mast Length.................

I have been using the 68cm mast for SUP surfing, for the past 10 month and really like it.

I'm getting a longer mast for WIND Foiling (and maybe WING Foiling in the future)

Do I go the 90 cm x 19 mm or 82 cm x 19 mm mast ?

I can WIND foil on my 68 cm mast, but when the ocean gets a bit choppy and small swells, the 68 cm seems to start to breach (820 Surf Wing), and it gets a little tricky trying to read the surface of the ocean, to stop the foil from breaching.

Thanks
Aaron


DavidJohn

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #442 on: October 14, 2020, 01:18:52 AM »
Iíd recommend going with the 82cm mast.

Admin

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #443 on: October 14, 2020, 01:41:23 AM »
Aaron,

The 96 will be sweet!  I had an amazing day this week that was really bad wind.  Super gusty and southerly.  The swell on one reach was jagged, in your face and large, on the other reach that same swell was super fun.  It would have been a royal pain to have to dip fully into each swell and then match the peak 100 times on each outbound reach.  A little mast length smooths that out a lot, and lets you carry way more speed.  It also makes banking turns way more fun.  The wind foilers here all run longer masts after they learn.  The racer guys are all on well upwards of 100 and many of the freerider/swellrider guys as well. 

Have you tried any of the other wings?  I don't wind foil but the 820 wouldn't be my first choice for that.  I know a couple of guys here who use the 900 and love it.  That wing is way lower drag and doesn't overfoil like the 820 at speed.  With a sail, you have a ton of power and a flatter take off so, it should be great.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2020, 01:49:47 AM by Admin »

Dwight (DW)

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #444 on: October 14, 2020, 03:19:17 AM »
Windsurfing you need to go long. You canít follow the ocean surface as easy as when winging. Your judgement on ride height is more challenging windsurfing than winging.

90 is STANDARD now with the Slingshot windsurf basic kit, so that tells you something right there. It used to be 70 standard.

Windsurfing foiling is just different than other forms of foiling. Iíve done all forms of foiling.

For those that donít windsurf....a windsurfer is hiked out (body weight to windward) with weight supported 50/50 between the sail and board, unlike a winger, supporting his weight 100 percent on the board. To ease off power when encountering a swell trough and follow the surface to avoid a foil blowout, we just sheet out the wing. A windsurfer cannot do this as easily. His weight is supported by the sail, and factored into the trim of the whole kit and foil. If he sheets out the sail, itís an instant wheelie from the foil and blow out. Everything has to be done carefully. Nothing like winging.....
« Last Edit: October 14, 2020, 03:33:41 AM by Dwight (DW) »

Phils

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #445 on: October 14, 2020, 03:20:41 AM »
I am like many here that enjoy trying different equipment for different conditions and riding goals but have decided to stick to one mast length range (81-85, Armstrong and Lift) for everything.  My main interests are downwind gliding and pumping and for that  foil depth makes a critical difference.  With one mast length, I can dial in the height I ride at to always keep my foil close to the surface and avoid having to relearn where my foil is every time I change mast lengths.

Aaron SUP

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #446 on: October 14, 2020, 05:22:09 AM »
Have you tried any of the other wings?  I don't wind foil but the 820 wouldn't be my first choice for that.  I know a couple of guys here who use the 900 and love it.  That wing is way lower drag and doesn't overfoil like the 820 at speed.  With a sail, you have a ton of power and a flatter take off so, it should be great.

I spend most of my time SUP surf foiling.    I have the 820 and 920 wings. 

I don't WIND foil often, so just trying to use what wings I already have.    I suppose I'm just trying to buy the minimum equipment at this stage.   Good thing with Axis is being so interchangeable.

Admin

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #447 on: October 14, 2020, 06:31:24 AM »
Understood.  If you ge a chance to try the 860 it could almost certainly replace your 820 and it would be great for winging (and likely windfoiling as well).  It also drags a lot less than the 820 and does not have any overfoiling issues. 

cnski

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #448 on: October 14, 2020, 08:03:32 AM »
Pretty much all the carbon masts offered by these companies are crap. The marketing BS from Armstrong is just an excuse to offer a chinese made mast with some kind of cheap core and low grade carbon. Sure you can ride them just fine and there is some performance gain when getting away from a 19mm aluminum mast. If these carbon masts were truly great these companies would be touting their construction, which they are not.

"A no compromise foil featuring the unique M40J high modulus carbon prepreg mast and wings to guarantee unreached performance"- A statement like this is what you want to hear. And you don't hear this from Axis or Armstrong.

You're better off with an Axis Aluminum mast than their carbon one. I tried an Axis carbon mast and wasn't impressed. My Delta freeride kitefoil has a custom 13mm UHM mast that is truly stiff and light years ahead in performance from the 15mm Aluminum counterpart.

My Mike's Lab kiteracing 110cm foil is the the stiffest most stable foil I have rode. I think it's under 13mm. It has a carbon mast you can be proud of. And you pay top dollar for this performance no doubt.

I'm winging on an Axis 19mm mast for now and hope to find something better in the future but nothing currently exists.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2020, 08:08:44 AM by cnski »

Califoilia

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Re: Axis Foils
« Reply #449 on: October 14, 2020, 09:08:43 AM »
Have you tried any of the other wings?  I don't wind foil but the 820 wouldn't be my first choice for that.  I know a couple of guys here who use the 900 and love it.  That wing is way lower drag and doesn't overfoil like the 820 at speed.  With a sail, you have a ton of power and a flatter take off so, it should be great.
I spend most of my time SUP surf foiling.    I have the 820 and 920 wings.
I only SUP foil surf, and my 90% go to wing set up is the 900/390. I have the 1000 and 750 fronts, but even in the smallest of stuff I find that the 900 still catches as many if not more waves than the 1000, and only use the 750 for when it's overhead and the 900 is just a little too "lifty" when it get up there like that. The only time the 1000 comes out of the van is to pair it up with the 460 stab just to play around and see how far I can pump back out and connect waves (which sadly, isn't too often :().

I had the 920 that I picked up with the intention of using it for wing foiling, but never got into winging...and after trying it just twice in the surf, sold it, because it's so much slower and far less maneuverable than the 900 (and not any more stable).

I think you'd really enjoy the 900 in the surf, and if Admin recommends it for the WIND or WING foiling don't think you can go wrong with that wing.

Just a note, I have tried the 860 in the surf also, and it's OK - better than the 920 - but still slower and less responsive in the turns than the 900. I can also say that the 910 is also really fun wing in the surf, and I've heard that its true HA profile makes it a good wing foil wing, so it might also be a consideration for you wrt the wind foil aspect of you quiver. 
Me: 6'1"/185...5'1" Kings Foil Board...5'7" Kings Foil Board...9'6" Bob Pearson "Laird Noserider"...14' Lahui Kai "Manta"...8'0" WaveStorm if/when the proning urges still hit.

 


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