Author Topic: Multi Year Fin Experiment on "no Toe"(straight) Fins  (Read 2425 times)

OkiWild

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Re: Multi Year Fin Experiment on "no Toe"(straight) Fins
« Reply #45 on: July 11, 2019, 06:42:03 AM »
You'll go crazy trying to rationalize the Toe and Cant and foils on fins. 

This is me now... Never really cared what fins were in a short board, even after FCS came out, just surfed whatever fin I put in the board and left it there. Not enough difference for me to get excited about it.

With SUP, maybe it's the planing surface area, or larger rail, or because the fins are farther apart, or simply because "body english" is much less effective, so a lot more of how the board responds relies on the fins...or a combo of all of it, but the fins make a huge difference.  I'm now $1,000 deep into a fin quiver...LOL  And I'm not a "fin changer." Just looking for that one magic all-around best set up for each board.


jarvissup

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Re: Multi Year Fin Experiment on "no Toe"(straight) Fins
« Reply #46 on: July 11, 2019, 09:15:34 AM »
Okiwild,
              I'm not, usually, a fin changer either. I figure out what a set up makes a board work best, then I usually set it and forget it. My usual performance set up is a three fin set up with Riptide fins in the side boxes, and a slightly smaller center fin. That set up works well for my small wave fish sup all the way through several sizes of performance board. In my performance long boards I prefer a twin fin set up. I have made several "no toe" sets of MR style twin fins that work amazingly well in those long boards.

Beasho

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Re: Multi Year Fin Experiment on "no Toe"(straight) Fins
« Reply #47 on: July 11, 2019, 12:43:04 PM »
Here was some classic fin talk in action.

I listened while Jeff Clark explained to Kai Lenny why his fins were working so well for him  ;D

I do NOT argue with Jeff Clark about anything regarding traditional surfing or SUP'ing.  He is still a surfing savant, been bigger, deeper . . . done it all and I am not worthy.

Foiling is a different story because we are learning together, breaking stuff and everyone is still figuring things out.   

jarvissup

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Re: Multi Year Fin Experiment on "no Toe"(straight) Fins
« Reply #48 on: July 11, 2019, 03:36:45 PM »
     Absolutely no point in arguing about a "science" that applied to different waves, on different boards, by different levels of surfers has a different kinesthetic observance. Though this is science, it's not rocket science. It's very easy to experience the applied science of "no toe" fins. Find a JP board that suits you, or is similar to the board that you're already riding, or if you have a board with futures style bases, stick a set of Riptide Fins in and see what you think.
      It's hard to do the "side by side comparo" with fins because it means coming in and switching fins out before the tide fills in etc., but you can do it. In most cases you'll notice a pretty big advantage in speed, but in my case, I really noticed after switching back to "toe" fins, the board just did everything slower. Boards with "no toe" fins are faster on the wave allowing you to make sections and get enough speed to make maneuvers, but the boards also paddle faster, which makes it easier to catch waves in the first place.

OkiWild

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Re: Multi Year Fin Experiment on "no Toe"(straight) Fins
« Reply #49 on: July 15, 2019, 05:13:14 PM »
Okiwild,
              I'm not, usually, a fin changer either. I figure out what a set up makes a board work best, then I usually set it and forget it. My usual performance set up is a three fin set up with Riptide fins in the side boxes, and a slightly smaller center fin. That set up works well for my small wave fish sup all the way through several sizes of performance board. In my performance long boards I prefer a twin fin set up. I have made several "no toe" sets of MR style twin fins that work amazingly well in those long boards.

Very interesting, and I love the R&D. I've always hated quads, but couldn't seem to get the thruster set-up perfect on a SUP, so I tried many different quad combos... Fast, sure, but didn't really turn the way I like. Problem with the thruster (for me) is tail release (slide) is much more pronounced on a SUP with it's wider tail and surface area, especially when there's chop. The Futures GL2's seemed to work the best, but still weren't quite there. Then an old-school buddy in Hawaii sent me some diffusers to test out, and it turned the board magic. Supposed to reduce turbulence off the back of the board...whatever...it worked. So I'm wondering if the straight fins might have a similar effect? Less turbulent flow coming off the back of the board, especially in aerated water with chop. At first, I was resistant to "straight" fins, as 99% have toe, but I'm finding that there are great differences between a standard short board and a SUP.