Author Topic: Max Heart Rate  (Read 2223 times)

hbsteve

  • Teahupoo Status
  • ******
  • Posts: 1695
    • View Profile
Max Heart Rate
« on: June 23, 2019, 07:51:56 PM »
Finding the formula for max heart rate is easy.
I don't see how that can so easily be applied across the board.
Because I have high blood pressure, I take my reading daily at various times of the day.  My average resting heart rate is 56.
Using 200-70, my max rate should be 150.
This doesn't seem possible.
Is there any other more personalized method of figuring max heart rate?

PonoBill

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 22866
    • View Profile
    • Ponohouse is for sale. Great house but it's time for new adventures
Re: Max Heart Rate
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2019, 08:37:13 PM »
The formulas are general. Maximum rate is rarely attainable for long, usually if you're looking to determine your exercise level you aim for a target rate, which is lower. But your genetic makeup, medications you take, thyroid condition, and other factors influence your personal maximum rate.

I had a lot of sports medicine testing done twenty or so years ago because I was concerned about my low heart rate during vigorous exercise (rarely above 120) and my tendency to retain or gain weight in spite of an extremely active life and moderate diet. The result was that my heart response to exercise was simply low normal, probably mostly genetic but perhaps related to the blood pressure medicine I take. Not very conclusive or useful considering the time and money I spent.
Ponohouse is for sale: http://www.ponohouse.com
Foote 10'4X34", SIC 17.5 V1 hollow and an EPS one in Hood River. Foote 9'0" x 31", L41 8'8", 18' Speedboard, etc. etc.

pdxmike

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 6179
    • View Profile
Re: Max Heart Rate
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2019, 08:47:29 PM »
PonoBill is right, the formulas are just general and you can't stay at the max very long.


The "220 minus age" rule of thumb will probably give you a number lower than your true max, esp. if you're older and fit.  Best way I know of measuring it is go run up a hill as hard as you can, or something else equally taxing (towards the end of a workout so you're totally warmed up) using a heart rate monitor, or immediately checking your pulse for 10 seconds and multiplying by six.



Here's my experience with max heart rate, and there's also a lot of other good input from lots of people about it in this old discussion:
https://www.standupzone.com/forum/index.php/topic,31285.msg344442.html#msg344442




ukgm

  • Teahupoo Status
  • ******
  • Posts: 1254
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Max Heart Rate
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2019, 11:37:42 PM »
Finding the formula for max heart rate is easy.
I don't see how that can so easily be applied across the board.
Because I have high blood pressure, I take my reading daily at various times of the day.  My average resting heart rate is 56.
Using 200-70, my max rate should be 150.
This doesn't seem possible.
Is there any other more personalized method of figuring max heart rate?
As everyone else says, 220-age is generalized (and has an intended intention to underestimate the max). The only really way to find out your max is lab tests doing things like a ramp test.

As it is, I don't use HR for anything other than occasional 'first thing in the morning' health checks if I feel 'off' (using resting heart rate as a check of fatigue - +5 beats over norm - take it easy, +10 beats over norm - take the day off).

Area 10

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 3916
    • View Profile
Re: Max Heart Rate
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2019, 12:10:45 AM »
Yes, I also agree with the above. The 220-age formula wasn’t meant to be used in this way (ie. for athletic purposes), and only is the vaguest guide to what you might expect, not what you’ll necessarily find. Pretty much everyone I know who is fit exceeds the 220-age formula. The only reason that formula is popular is that it is easy to use - not because it is accurate. There are better formulae but they are more complicated. And you can still expect to exceed them if you are very fit. So, as said above, the only way to really know what your max HR is, is to totally beast yourself. This is a pretty unpleasant experience and can even be dangerous. So I’d suggest you don’t bother! Mostly, your perceived exertion will match quite well your HR capability. In other words, if your estimate when you are exercising is that you are working at eg. 85% of your (safe) maximum, then you probably are, more or less. Our bodies are quite good at telling us what we should and shouldn’t attempt. So listen to your body.