Author Topic: Roof transport in summer  (Read 3636 times)

spirit4earth

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Re: Roof transport in summer
« Reply #60 on: May 20, 2019, 12:18:13 PM »

This is the technique I have been using (note: I have dinged the tail of my 11' board on the ground using this technique during a strong gust):
When it is windy, have the tie downs straps within reach.  Have something soft on the ground under the tail of your board.  I wear the Beasho SUP shoulder strap, I put the nose of the board on my front roof crossbar, then temporarily secure the Beasho carrying strap around my roof rack.  Then I carefully lift the tail of the board onto the roof rack.  I have one hand on the board, and use the other to put the straps on the board.   I admit that I use kanulocks with the traditional tie down pattern.  Once you can get one tie down secure, you can breathe a sigh of relief.  But when it is windy, this method looks faster and easier:

When it gets windy, I prefer using a shorter board, which eventually defers to kitesurfing.

So with Robert’s 30 second method, is the only place where the strap is OUTSIDE the towers on the far front, where he first throws the strap over?

spirit4earth

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Re: Roof transport in summer
« Reply #61 on: May 20, 2019, 12:19:40 PM »
Nothing to do with “summer”, but I’m curious....
Does anyone know of a board EVER snapping in half due to lift while driving?

Night Wing

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Re: Roof transport in summer
« Reply #62 on: May 20, 2019, 01:36:56 PM »
@ spirit4earth

In this topic thread, go back to Reply #33 from me which has a photo of my 11'1' One World on the roof of my truck's cab. My board is transported "deckpad side down on my padded roof racks with fins over my truck's windshield, pointed up vertically towards the sky".

When transported this way, there is "no lift". The lift occurs when some people transport the board with "deckpad side up with the rocker of the nose pointing upward over the windshield.
Blue Planet Duke: 10'5" x 32" x 4.5" @ 190 Liters
Sup Sports Hammer: 8'11" x 31" x 4" @ 140 Liters
SUP Sports One World: 11'1" x 30" x 4.5" @ 173 Liters

RideTheGlide

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Re: Roof transport in summer
« Reply #63 on: May 20, 2019, 05:50:55 PM »
@ spirit4earth

In this topic thread, go back to Reply #33 from me which has a photo of my 11'1' One World on the roof of my truck's cab. My board is transported "deckpad side down on my padded roof racks with fins over my truck's windshield, pointed up vertically towards the sky".

When transported this way, there is "no lift". The lift occurs when some people transport the board with "deckpad side up with the rocker of the nose pointing upward over the windshield.
I have been transporting my 14' board deckpad down. I think the primary force of lift I get is windshield deflection. I run lines from tie down points. Mine are very secure; they are basically leash attach points (same hardware) inset into the board. When I kayaked a lot, the "rule" was to use a rack to keep the boat off the car and lines to keep it on the car. My big Glide is practically a boat. I do strap it securely to the rack, but don't want to test just how secure the rack is.
2016 Naish Glide 14x30 GTW
2017 GoPlus 9'9" x 6" iSUP (generic low end all around)

spirit4earth

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Re: Roof transport in summer
« Reply #64 on: May 20, 2019, 05:59:09 PM »
@ spirit4earth

In this topic thread, go back to Reply #33 from me which has a photo of my 11'1' One World on the roof of my truck's cab. My board is transported "deckpad side down on my padded roof racks with fins over my truck's windshield, pointed up vertically towards the sky".

When transported this way, there is "no lift". The lift occurs when some people transport the board with "deckpad side up with the rocker of the nose pointing upward over the windshield.
I have been transporting my 14' board deckpad down. I think the primary force of lift I get is windshield deflection. I run lines from tie down points. Mine are very secure; they are basically leash attach points (same hardware) inset into the board. When I kayaked a lot, the "rule" was to use a rack to keep the boat off the car and lines to keep it on the car. My big Glide is practically a boat. I do strap it securely to the rack, but don't want to test just how secure the rack is.

That’s what I’ve done with kayaks.  Wetstuff is helping me with  system that can keep the tail from lifting too much.  I have a very slanted windshield—-lots of wind coming up from it.

Night Wing

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Re: Roof transport in summer
« Reply #65 on: May 20, 2019, 11:08:39 PM »
@ spirit4earth

My roof racks are Thule roof racks (towers and bars) bought back in 2003. They are not aluminum. They are steel. I travel down the highway on Interstate I-45 south to Galveston doing 75 mph. Never have any problems with the way I strap both of my boards to my roof racks in conjunction with high speed highway driving.
Blue Planet Duke: 10'5" x 32" x 4.5" @ 190 Liters
Sup Sports Hammer: 8'11" x 31" x 4" @ 140 Liters
SUP Sports One World: 11'1" x 30" x 4.5" @ 173 Liters