Author Topic: getting back on the pad  (Read 1194 times)

toolate

  • Rincon Status
  • ***
  • Posts: 150
    • View Profile
getting back on the pad
« on: February 03, 2019, 01:45:07 PM »
I surf a JL stun gun now for 2 years. I used to think " why did they put the kick pad so far back, i'll never get on that except in the steepest waves" (admittedly the SG seems to be FOR steep waves.)

But over time i find i am back there more and more. Wondering what accounts for that ? I mean obviously technique is getting better but how could that slow learning curve for me have been speeded up?

mrbig

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 2279
    • View Profile
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2019, 01:52:23 PM »
Supboarder the mag has a good vid on that topic.

I am sure there are others!
Let it come to you..
404 Go Go 14'
404 V3 12'6"
Infinity New Deal 9'6"
SMIK Hipster Twin 9'2"
SMIK 8'8" Short Mac Freo Rainbow Bridge
Infinity 8'5" RNB
King's 8'2" Accelerator SharkBoy

supthecreek

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 6394
  • Sunova is a Zone sponsor and I am their spokesman
    • View Profile
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2019, 03:17:22 PM »
It's a funny thing.
On my 14'r, I get back to the stomper on every turn...
but on my 9'4 , I never do.

Necessity most likely in my case... the 14 won't turn unless I am at the tail,
but my 9'4 turns really well with my back foot on the rail, over the side bite.
I also suspect that on my 9'4, standing all the way back on the stomper stalls the board.
A person my height, but 50 lbs lighter may have the same stance as me, but on a smaller board, his back foot will be on the stomper and his front will be near the handle, so no stalling.

On speeding up the learning curve:
Early on, I had a hard time getting myself to switch paddle sides when turning, so.....
I would spend entire sessions on ONLY that.

Before a wave I would say "Switch paddle sides"!!!!!
That was my only focus, I didn't care about the rest of the ride....

my sole purpose was to ingrain the paddle switch into a routing action.


FRP

  • Bob
  • Sunset Status
  • ****
  • Posts: 272
    • View Profile
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2019, 05:29:34 PM »
Creek

I admire your commitment to improving your surfing. It is easily said but for many of us, myself included, it is difficult to pass on a good ride on a wave. This is what my surfing mentor told me to do if I wanted to learn to bottom turn. For an entire session make your bottom turn so hard that you kick out the back of the wave. One turn, one wave. Do you think I can do this? No ......I just hate to think that I have “wasted” a good wave. Now you have given me another goal of changing paddle side going left but also another prod to improve my bottom which is likely going to involve getting my back foot a little further back.

Cheers

Bob
Sunova 8'10" Skate
Sunova 8'10" Speeed
Sunova 8’7” Creek
Riviera 14’ Downwinder
Werner Nitro Adjustable carbon
KeNalu Konihi 84 adjustable
Kialoa Pipes II

"The time spent surfing is time that is added to my life"
Anon

toolate

  • Rincon Status
  • ***
  • Posts: 150
    • View Profile
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2019, 07:34:01 PM »
this is great advice
It's a funny thing.
On my 14'r, I get back to the stomper on every turn...
but on my 9'4 , I never do.

Necessity most likely in my case... the 14 won't turn unless I am at the tail,
but my 9'4 turns really well with my back foot on the rail, over the side bite.
I also suspect that on my 9'4, standing all the way back on the stomper stalls the board.
A person my height, but 50 lbs lighter may have the same stance as me, but on a smaller board, his back foot will be on the stomper and his front will be near the handle, so no stalling.

On speeding up the learning curve:
Early on, I had a hard time getting myself to switch paddle sides when turning, so.....
I would spend entire sessions on ONLY that.

Before a wave I would say "Switch paddle sides"!!!!!
That was my only focus, I didn't care about the rest of the ride....

my sole purpose was to ingrain the paddle switch into a routing action.

PonoBill

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 21801
    • View Profile
    • Ponohouse is for sale. Great house but it's time for new adventures
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2019, 08:39:47 AM »
It's challenging to ignore the ride and focus on getting better, since the ride is what makes us do this sport to begin with. Foiling has that problem squared. I'm trying to improve and tighten up my turns, but as soon as I get up in the air on a wave the voice in my head yells "I'm flying!!" and my plans go to shit.
Ponohouse is for sale: http://www.ponohouse.com
Foote 10'4X34", SIC 17.5 V1 hollow and an EPS one in Hood River. Foote 9'0" x 31", L41 8'8", 18' Speedboard, etc. etc.

supsean

  • Rincon Status
  • ***
  • Posts: 100
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2019, 10:00:59 AM »
It's challenging to ignore the ride and focus on getting better, since the ride is what makes us do this sport to begin with. Foiling has that problem squared. I'm trying to improve and tighten up my turns, but as soon as I get up in the air on a wave the voice in my head yells "I'm flying!!" and my plans go to shit.

Really made me smile!
fanatic all wave 8'10"

toolate

  • Rincon Status
  • ***
  • Posts: 150
    • View Profile
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2019, 11:55:53 AM »
It's challenging to ignore the ride and focus on getting better, since the ride is what makes us do this sport to begin with. Foiling has that problem squared. I'm trying to improve and tighten up my turns, but as soon as I get up in the air on a wave the voice in my head yells "I'm flying!!" and my plans go to shit.

this quote makes me want to start foiling

supthecreek

  • Cortez Bank Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 6394
  • Sunova is a Zone sponsor and I am their spokesman
    • View Profile
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2019, 12:35:58 PM »
Creek

I admire your commitment to improving your surfing. It is easily said but for many of us, myself included, it is difficult to pass on a good ride on a wave. This is what my surfing mentor told me to do if I wanted to learn to bottom turn. For an entire session make your bottom turn so hard that you kick out the back of the wave. One turn, one wave. Do you think I can do this? No ......I just hate to think that I have “wasted” a good wave. Now you have given me another goal of changing paddle side going left but also another prod to improve my bottom which is likely going to involve getting my back foot a little further back.

Cheers

Bob

I like your mentors thinking.... but there is a way that will let you have your ride and "kickout turn too!"

At the end of the wave, do the hardest possible turn you can, to kick-out.
This will let you learn just how far over the rail you can commit, without messing up your ride.
After you have a good feel for a full on rail turn, you can more easily incorporate it into your surfing.

here's 28 second slo-mo of a controlled turn.... out of the wave.
This was my 9'1 Creek when I first got it...
I wanted to see just how much I could lay it over, and stay in control.


toolate

  • Rincon Status
  • ***
  • Posts: 150
    • View Profile
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2019, 12:55:17 PM »
way to CRANK that turn! but you missed the chance for a nice off the lip  8)

FRP

  • Bob
  • Sunset Status
  • ****
  • Posts: 272
    • View Profile
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2019, 05:51:13 PM »
Thanks Rick

Amazing bottom turn! Your outside fin out of the water and defying gravity out over the rail. Great idea to practice this at the end of the ride. Hope to get out in the water tomorrow to try it out....I will report back, try to switch paddle sides and inch my back foot back. I think to get my back foot even a few inches further back it means a wider stance and not moving both feet. I have found that when I try to get my back foot back without widening my stance the board just starts bouncing around. It is the pressure on the front foot that is needed to stabilize the board. There are just so many things going on when surfing. It is no wonder that it becomes such an addiction and endless search.

Cheers

Bob
Sunova 8'10" Skate
Sunova 8'10" Speeed
Sunova 8’7” Creek
Riviera 14’ Downwinder
Werner Nitro Adjustable carbon
KeNalu Konihi 84 adjustable
Kialoa Pipes II

"The time spent surfing is time that is added to my life"
Anon

FRP

  • Bob
  • Sunset Status
  • ****
  • Posts: 272
    • View Profile
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2019, 05:09:55 PM »
On this thread was mentioned practicing switching sides with the paddle. This video from “Blue Zone” I found very helpful.

Bob

Sunova 8'10" Skate
Sunova 8'10" Speeed
Sunova 8’7” Creek
Riviera 14’ Downwinder
Werner Nitro Adjustable carbon
KeNalu Konihi 84 adjustable
Kialoa Pipes II

"The time spent surfing is time that is added to my life"
Anon

The Kernel

  • Sunset Status
  • ****
  • Posts: 329
  • Dana Point, CA
    • View Profile
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2019, 07:08:29 PM »
This issue has perplexed me for a long time...Never quite dialed it in to a level of nuance that I feel totally comfortable with on my boards, and of course, each board is different.

What HAS helped me was going out far away from crowded breaks to a place like Trails here in SoCal, then using the session to experiment with forcing that rear foot closer to the tail--wrecking as many times as necessary; that has been invaluable in getting a feel for that particular board I'm riding.   Under those conditions, I don't feel bad for "wasting" a wave or looking like a doofus, because there is no one physically close enough to care about anything.

Of course, those sessions are rare, and if you saw me surf, you'd wonder why I hadn't learned a lot more by now....
Kernel:  Cutting through the bull**it.
"This is the kernel of the argument."

Over 50, but usually pushing it like I'm 25 and paying for it later.

8' Riviera Nugget
8'2" + 9'2" T. Patterson / Rivieras
9'2" Riviera Nugg Turbo Carbon
10' Riviera Machete

joelcr

  • Malibu Status
  • **
  • Posts: 82
    • View Profile
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2019, 12:36:30 PM »
I’m with Creek on this one. On my 14 Bullet in the surf, I can get my back foot all the way over the fin to initiate a turn, but on my other surfing sups my rear foot is almost never on the stomp pad. Yet I still catch good waves and can turn fine.

I think one thing has to do with there being rear-footed surfers, and front-footed surfers. Think short boarders(6’2”) slashing about on their fins, versus gunnier boards using their rails to carve. I still move my feet on the board, but since I’m usually surfing hollower, steeper waves I tend to go for speed rather than trying to smash a lip. Also my boards tend to wheelie and stall when my foot is way back.

Maybe on sloping waves with a smaller board you can push more off the back foot.
Sometimes I do, but not a lot. It’s a style thing as well, I prefer to watch a surfer with nice flow use less input, versus a herky-jerky thrash dance. Most of us aren’t pros, and throwing a sup around with style is hard. Most of the pros are on 7’6” x 25 wide boards. Even harder.

One last thing is to look at video of surfers barrel riding, their back foot is almost always forward of the pad. Works fine for them.

APPST_Paddle

  • Peahi Status
  • *****
  • Posts: 552
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: getting back on the pad
« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2019, 03:02:58 AM »
Two things have helped me (and they were pointed out by a 1 day course with Chase at Blue Zone in CR - highly recommend):

1. I'm a kiter so I didn't realize this until he pointed it out but I put a lot of weight on my back foot. I've worked on adding more pressure on my front foot when generating speed and it helps a lot (I'm guessing foiling this spring/summer on a kite will help that too). How does this help get your foot back and crank turns? It keeps speed and forward momentum in weak sections.

2. You aren't trying to ride the whole time with your foot all the way back, you want to reach back to gain extra leverage on the turns. This makes it a lot easier, so as you go to initiate a turn, just get a bit lower and stretched out and reach back.

I'm finally getting it right occasionally on a wave (probably 20% of the time) or at least it feels right.
7'6" JL Super Frank Lean
8'3" JL SuperTech 
10'1" JL Black and Blue
14' BIC WS Tracer
Kenalu Ho'oloa 95, Werner Rip Stick 79