Author Topic: Longboard size for smaller waves  (Read 1847 times)

RideTheGlide

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Re: Longboard size for smaller waves
« Reply #15 on: January 02, 2019, 11:15:41 AM »
But it takes skill to surf boards over 11ft well, and to be safe in bigger surf. So Id suggest trying a standard 10-6 board like the Naish Nalu 10-6 or Fanatic 10-6 first. 10-6 is (probably) the most popular length board in the world for good reason. It is a good compromise between wave-catching (and stability) and manoeuvrability, for average sized people.
What's "average sized"? As a 5'7" 155 pound older adult male, I might be considered more "fun size"  ;D  8)  ::)
Depends where you live. In many places in the world you are an average size.

Dont go over 30 wide at your weight and height. Youll find a 32 wide board hard to accelerate fast enough to get into small waves, and at 57 it will be tiring for you to get the paddle perpendicular when paddling. To get into small crappy waves you need a board that is as narrow and long as your skills can cope with, and that does not have too much rocker. Short fat boards do not work well for smaller people in *really* weak surf, like you are contemplating.

But as Ive said before, the key caveat here is as your skills can cope with. 30 wide should be fine for pretty much anyone your height and weight. If you have good balance you could even go 1-2 narrower. In terms of length, most people your size can cope with boards up to 10ft very easily, and most feel comfortable up to 106. Beyond that, unless you are going for a very gun-like shape, you might start to feel intimidated by the sheer bulk of the board in the surf, and youll have to really know how to turn a board to get the most out of it. I regularly surf a 16ft x 26 wide board in crappy weak waves, and it is still possible to do cutbacks on a board like long, if you know how. I also have a 12-6 which I use for very small weak blown-out waves. Im quite often out at my local break in those conditions catching wave after wave when virtually everyone else is busting a gut to get onto a wave but failing. Funnily enough, these are the same people who comment on how big my board is when Im walking to the water. They assume Im a beginner, I think, when Im walking. But pretty soon in the water the logic becomes obvious. Ive been surfing really marginal waves for decades, and Ive learnt what equipment I need to have most fun in them. That equipment is not the usual short, wide, high volume fare that is pushed to beginners.


I like the idea of something like the 11' 4" x 30" Nalu but really don't know enough to say whether it is truly a good choice. I am not sure I will become a surfer but would like to have a board that I could surf but is useful for paddling a few miles also. I have not been paddling SUP long. Decades of paddling other things but very late to the game with SUP. I plan to do some offshore fishing and touring this year and spent my current toy budget outfitting for that so it will likely be a little while before I add a board into the mix. Practicing beach launches/landings on my big Glide, I did manage to surf a few small waves though it might be more correct to say they surfed me. I got on them on purpose and enjoyed the surfing sensation but went straight in. If someone had gotten in my way I would have had to jump in or mow them down.

Here in NC, if you insist on something other than small waves you won't get nearly as many good days and on those days most rides will be short. Besides, like I said I am late to this game. I can still learn some new tricks but I don't think becoming a big wave surfer at 60 would be all that smart, especially since I don't want to to dedicate all my paddling time to it. I probably need to learn to turn the battleship on my landing surfs though.
2016 Naish Glide 14x30 GTW
2017 GoPlus 9'9" x 6" iSUP (generic low end all around)

Scallop

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Re: Longboard size for smaller waves
« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2019, 01:40:15 PM »
I ride the "shmall" all the time on my 10'11" x 32 NSP Allrounder..

Fairly inexpensive but kind of heavy.

I'm 215, could go smaller...have a new board coming soon.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2019, 01:42:04 PM by Scallop »
Sunova Steeze 9'6"
NSP Allrounder 10'11"
Surftech 10'6"

maxsonic

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Re: Longboard size for smaller waves
« Reply #17 on: January 02, 2019, 08:39:08 PM »
Captain,

before I made a recommendation I tried to follow your links (most didn't work) but one did and it's a funky SoCal company selling $499 boards (kinda dubious) The folks here refered you to some excellent boards but they aren't $499. ONE of the big differences between those boards and the recomendations here is construction ( a big part of the price difference)Not withstanding Shape (design) & components
So my recomendation(assuming the $499 price is the KEY)  is take theManufacturer/ model and dimensions posted here and check you local craigslist (and the like) Once you see what is available to you. This diverse but knowledgeable group can again help you in selecting the right board.

Have fun

JimK
Extreme Windsurfing.com

Agree with JimK!  Stick with the brand names you see here on the Zone, not cheap knock-offs. 

Jimmy Lewis currently has a sale ongoing, you might want to take a look at the Jimmy Lewis Cruise Control...a local loaned me his at Kanaha Beach Park, Maui...I was able to catch many more waves than the wider Starboard Whopper that I was renting. 

http://jimmylewis.com/shop/cruise-control/

MAX

comeu

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Re: Longboard size for smaller waves
« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2019, 02:27:15 AM »
I agree with maxsonic who agreed with jimK... Buying a cheap knockoff will finally  cost you more money, with less fun in the waves.

RideTheGlide

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Re: Longboard size for smaller waves
« Reply #19 on: January 05, 2019, 07:14:24 AM »
I agree with maxsonic who agreed with jimK... Buying a cheap knockoff will finally  cost you more money, with less fun in the waves.
I got a cheap iSUP as my intro to SUP paddling and used it for paddling with other beginners on lakes and it functioned every bit as well for that as most name brands. The paddle that came with it is heavy; about my only complaint. But because it was capable of doing what I was trying to do, it didn't make me feel like I couldn't do it.

I worry that if I go cheap on more advanced forms of paddling, a cheap knock off could make me feel like I couldn't do something I would be capable of with better equipment. I spent a lot more on a big stable touring board for venturing out into the open ocean to fish and tour. In that case, not only could poor equipment make me feel like I couldn't do it, it could get down right dangerous.

I am drawn to the idea of learning to surf smaller waves. A lot more opportunity where I am and many of the boards for it are not that specialized and I would use in other situations. I really don't want to get frustrated trying to learn and decide it is something I am not good enough at to pursue.

The next board I want is something like a Saber, Nalu or One World that can catch small waves and do some light touring with decent performance on flat water. In the meantime, I can try to learn to catch really small waves on my Glide. I have browsed a few I think are "mid range" like the CBC Edge, but if I spend $800 I would be getting up into the kind of money where I should be able to find one on my short list used.
2016 Naish Glide 14x30 GTW
2017 GoPlus 9'9" x 6" iSUP (generic low end all around)

Ichabod Spoonbill

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Re: Longboard size for smaller waves
« Reply #20 on: January 05, 2019, 07:39:37 AM »
You can often score a used Bic cheaply. Their Tough/Dura-tec constructions are heavy, but the Ace-tecs might be right for you. They make a 10'6" which is a good size for light cruising and small waves. They even have tie-downs.

Bics aren't flashy but they're a reliable ride. The surf shapes have been around for a while. Stay away from their Cross models which are strictly flatwater boards.
Pau Hana 11' Big EZ Ricochet (Beluga)
NSP 14' Race (Ghost)

RideTheGlide

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Re: Longboard size for smaller waves
« Reply #21 on: January 05, 2019, 08:13:23 AM »
You can often score a used Bic cheaply. Their Tough/Dura-tec constructions are heavy, but the Ace-tecs might be right for you. They make a 10'6" which is a good size for light cruising and small waves. They even have tie-downs.

Bics aren't flashy but they're a reliable ride. The surf shapes have been around for a while. Stay away from their Cross models which are strictly flatwater boards.

This one?
https://www.rei.com/rei-garage/product/142449/bic-sport-ace-tec-performer-stand-up-paddle-board-106

That's an attractive price point and not a bad looking board.
2016 Naish Glide 14x30 GTW
2017 GoPlus 9'9" x 6" iSUP (generic low end all around)

Ichabod Spoonbill

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Re: Longboard size for smaller waves
« Reply #22 on: January 05, 2019, 01:43:39 PM »
Yeah, that one. At 26 lbs it isn't too heavy, and the Ace-tec shell is very tough. Tougher than 90% of the other boards out there. That's not a bad price too.

Again, a Bic is the equivalent of buying a Honda Civic instead of a Porsche or BMW. It's solid, but not flashy. Those shapes have been around forever, which means they work. I kinda wish I had one myself. My small wave board is an 11' Pau Hana, which is a 34 lb beast. I wish I had something like smaller this.
Pau Hana 11' Big EZ Ricochet (Beluga)
NSP 14' Race (Ghost)

RideTheGlide

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Re: Longboard size for smaller waves
« Reply #23 on: January 05, 2019, 02:17:38 PM »
Yeah, that one. At 26 lbs it isn't too heavy, and the Ace-tec shell is very tough. Tougher than 90% of the other boards out there. That's not a bad price too.

Again, a Bic is the equivalent of buying a Honda Civic instead of a Porsche or BMW. It's solid, but not flashy. Those shapes have been around forever, which means they work. I kinda wish I had one myself. My small wave board is an 11' Pau Hana, which is a 34 lb beast. I wish I had something like smaller this.
Another one for my short list; the price makes it possible sooner than the others.
2016 Naish Glide 14x30 GTW
2017 GoPlus 9'9" x 6" iSUP (generic low end all around)

1tuberider

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Re: Longboard size for smaller waves
« Reply #24 on: January 06, 2019, 08:21:02 AM »
Aye Captain
Most who have been with this for a while have had many boards.
Experience helps with choice. Since your at Kook level, most boards
will work well. Just get one, use it and before long you will be wanting
another.