Author Topic: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's  (Read 3738 times)

blueplanetsurf

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SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« on: July 09, 2017, 10:21:56 AM »
In this video the Blue Planet team talks about why they use low volume SUP's and how to do it. 
Ty Judson rides a 7'3 x 23" x 68L board and weighs 74kg.
Robert Stehlik
Blue Planet Surf Shop, Honolulu
Hawaii's SUP HQ
http://www.blueplanetsurf.com

Night Wing

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2017, 12:31:12 PM »
These low volume type of boards aren't for me. These look like boards for the young and I don't mean young at heart either. At my age I'm too old and with a cranky lower back, a board like this would either wear me out within five minutes of time or throw out my lower back. And to get these boards, when submerged, takes a lot of powerful paddle strokes to create enough dynamic lift to bring the board to the surface to plane.

After watching the video, I think if I was a young buck in my 20's again, I still wouldn't try it. More power to those who can do this and like it.

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2017, 02:23:49 PM »
It's all in the perspective I reckon...I rode my share of prone short boards...sub-6' Fish shapes...etc...when I was growing up...so, if I was back in my 20's again, I would most likely be interested in riding some of the really low volume surfboard designs that have developed...than surf and paddle a low volume submarine SUP, which incidentally still has more volume and girth than prone long boards...again, perspective...

Admittedly, when I do ride my sub-8" SUP designs, I do enjoy the looser "surfboard-like" feeling that they give me decades and scores of waves after my roaring 20's became a speck in the rear view mirror...;-)



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surfcowboy

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2017, 03:12:40 PM »
Robert, thanks for another great, and informative video. You really understand permission marketing. (Any folks on here that don't know the term and own a business, I highly recommend you look it up. It really helped me and a lot of folks I know.)

Also, great that you start with your own preference for a bit more volume. Just because we don't all drive formula one cars doesn't mean we don't want to know about them. A lot of what has driven me to surf prone more was wanting the feel of a lower volume board. I think that as shapes progress I might be willing to try something smaller again.

I follow regular guys in Instagram (some of whom used to post here) who now ride 25" wide boards and work a day job. ;)

Wanting a better surf experience has pushed me far beyond what I thought I could do and I'm grateful for the motivation though I do t know if I'll ever make it into a 24 lol. Again, thanks for the vid.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 03:15:28 PM by surfcowboy »

blueplanetsurf

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2017, 12:56:06 PM »
Robert, thanks for another great, and informative video. You really understand permission marketing. (Any folks on here that don't know the term and own a business, I highly recommend you look it up. It really helped me and a lot of folks I know.)

Also, great that you start with your own preference for a bit more volume. Just because we don't all drive formula one cars doesn't mean we don't want to know about them. A lot of what has driven me to surf prone more was wanting the feel of a lower volume board. I think that as shapes progress I might be willing to try something smaller again.

I follow regular guys in Instagram (some of whom used to post here) who now ride 25" wide boards and work a day job. ;)

Wanting a better surf experience has pushed me far beyond what I thought I could do and I'm grateful for the motivation though I do t know if I'll ever make it into a 24 lol. Again, thanks for the vid.

Thanks Surfcowboy, I have not heard the term permission marketing before but I saw there is a book by that title and I'll check it out.  I think sharing what you learn is valuable and if we can attach our logo and get some exposure from it, that's even better.   It seems like "How To" videos always do well on youtube and this one has been blowing up with over 9000 views in the first 48 hours. 

I'm not sure what the right amount of volume is, it really depends on the the person and the conditions.  I weigh about 90 kg and really struggle on anything below 100L but I guess the only way you get used to lower volume boards is to use them.  Seeing what Ty and Nathan can do on boards that don't float their body weight is motivation to go smaller for sure. 
Robert Stehlik
Blue Planet Surf Shop, Honolulu
Hawaii's SUP HQ
http://www.blueplanetsurf.com

digger71

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2017, 01:32:52 PM »
While there is no question that smaller boards perform better, the real question for me is at what point you've given up all the advantages of being on a SUP in the first place.  A sub-100 liter SUP is still a dog compared to a performance shortboard. 

With that said, I'm still going smaller until I find that point :)

SlatchJim

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2017, 01:47:59 PM »
I was out at Doho this weekend and said hello to anonsurfer on his Lazy Boy board.  Although he's sporting far fewer atoms than I am, there's no doubting that he's riding a really small board (80L), and he rips it up.  More power to him.

Bean

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2017, 02:16:17 PM »
In this video the Blue Planet team talks about why they use low volume SUP's and how to do it. 
Ty Judson rides a 7'3 x 23" x 68L board and weighs 74kg.

Since part of the riders body would be submersed, it would stand to reason that the higher the BMI the higher the achievable ratio of weight to volume. So, eat up!  ;D
« Last Edit: July 10, 2017, 03:09:30 PM by Bean »

SUPcheat

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2017, 02:38:01 PM »
My main interest in lower volume boards was to get the turning paradigm because everybody said that the shorter, curvier, and lower volume, the turny-er.

I'm pulling back a bit from the low volume aspiration because I have advanced in my turning learning and can turn the "larger" boards fairly well, now.

Also, if you can get back on the tail, a longer board becomes effectively shorter as long as the nose is in the air and isn't engaging water.  The Speeed tail is a case in point, you get back there and suddenly you are flipping the thing around like crazy.  Admittedly, it isn't a continuous, smooth arc on the wave front, but it is effective.

I watch the finless skim boarders at Privates doing their spins and loop arounds on shore breaks, and it strikes me that there is a spectrum between that sport and short boarding on waves on the open ocean. 

I guess everybody's suffering to joy ratio varies for what they want to do.

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Newps

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2017, 01:21:57 PM »
"Thanks Surfcowboy, I have not heard the term permission marketing before but I saw there is a book by that title and I'll check it out.  I think sharing what you learn is valuable and if we can attach our logo and get some exposure from it, that's even better.   It seems like "How To" videos always do well on youtube and this one has been blowing up with over 9000 views in the first 48 hours."

30,000 + views in 9days...nice job! = $360 bucks...thanks Youtube, you scam artists!

Keep up with the great content!  No way in hell I could sink a board like that and still get going again.  I would love the performance on the wave but hate it everywhere else.

P.S. - I know you don't do this for the Youtube money.  It just grinds my gears that they pay so little but sit back and enjoy the profit.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2017, 01:25:39 PM by Newps »
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anonsurfer

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2017, 04:43:34 PM »
I was out at Doho this weekend and said hello to anonsurfer on his Lazy Boy board.  Although he's sporting far fewer atoms than I am, there's no doubting that he's riding a really small board (80L), and he rips it up.  More power to him.

While there is no question that smaller boards perform better, the real question for me is at what point you've given up all the advantages of being on a SUP in the first place.  A sub-100 liter SUP is still a dog compared to a performance shortboard. 

With that said, I'm still going smaller until I find that point :)

Thanks Jim.  I felt a little out of sync that morning but it was great to finally meet you.   

I agree with digger71.  For myself the goal is to go as small as possible while still being able to comfortably stand and cruise the line up.   Not sure I'll ever go sub 1.0 guild factor like the kids in the video though :-) 
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blueplanetsurf

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #11 on: July 22, 2017, 05:56:08 PM »
We just posted the second video in our series of SUP surfing tips: Getting through the waves.
Please add any tips we missed in the video:

Robert Stehlik
Blue Planet Surf Shop, Honolulu
Hawaii's SUP HQ
http://www.blueplanetsurf.com

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2017, 12:19:08 PM »
Here is another SUP Surfing How To video with tips for better bottom turns:

Robert Stehlik
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banzai

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Re: SUP Surfing progression: riding low volume SUP's
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2017, 10:09:27 PM »
This type of board is great if you're at someplace with no crowd, because it seem to put you at a disadvantage to maneuver into position to catch the wave. Your take off area will be way smaller than a board that will float you enabling you to move around easier. For me I've tried lower volume boards, they're better at turns but harder at catching the wave. So I use board shape and fin size/shape to give more turning ability. Plus age is a BIG factor.