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Messages - ukgm

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1
With his power, low body fat, and stamina, he should do very well on it.

He'd do well on a skimboard or pretty much anything else for that matter but that's not the point.

From the looks of it, he has a smaller frame than yours Photo, 135 if I had to guess. Having close knowledge of this board you'd know
that it doesn't play to your strength. Yes, he's much stronger and skilled but you'd have to think it puts him in immediate disadvantage,
especially on flat water where bigger stronger paddlers can jump on a 21" board no problem. Should be interesting.

I agree. With the GT at circa 297 and the Signature over 300, the volumes are ideal for me but must surely be too high for someone of Bruno's slight build.

2
Training, Diet, and Fitness / Re: Sugar is sneaky bad....
« on: January 18, 2019, 12:27:25 AM »

Another bit of irony from studies is that the most successful diets, as far as losing weight and keeping it off, are the cheapest - no special foods, no meal replacement shakes/bars (at least not regularly), no restrictive menus, etc; just proper portions and balancing calories consumed with calories burned.

I don't believe this (at least, not in the UK). Eating fresh (if you want the variety you need or fancy organic) requires considerably more cost than crap ready meals and dodgy pizza's. That's part of the reason why we have an obesity crisis - cost and convenience.

Also, I've recently returned from my usual holiday in the states and I was struck (still) by how badly stocked several supermarkets are out there in comparison to our own here (although I did see an increase in gluten free and organic produce from previous years).

3
Training, Diet, and Fitness / Re: Sugar is sneaky bad....
« on: January 17, 2019, 01:26:23 AM »
Good work chaps!

I've known for some time (years!) that sugar is the big cause of weight gain but have repeatedly struggled with suitable substitutions in my daily diet.

I'm not super fat but have chub and would like to trim it down. No food leaves me feeling full for very long and I like to eat. Regular grazing is hard to avoid and when I've tried to exclude that grazing, I've just found myself really really thinking about needing food!

Any tips?
Everyone has to find the right thing for them. But in my case it is a Keto-type diet, with low carbs (and definitely no sugar), and plenty of fibre, fat and protein. The fat keeps me full, and I have lost about 14lbs without even trying. For me, carbs make me hungry: All carbs seem to do is feed my hunger! Protein, fibre and fat all seem to stabilise my blood sugar, and without that see-sawing, I donít get as hungry. So, for me, itís a diet without dieting. Itís strange at first to be avoiding all bread, beer, potatoes, rice, pasta etc (and of course no sweets, cakes, or candy etc), but you soon get used to it. Now I use cream by the bucketload and lose weight! Itís strange to actually be looking for high fat foods after decades of being told it will make me fat. But actually it seems to help me lose weight, not gain it. We certainly have been totally lied to all these years, by the sugar lobby. In time we will probably come to see the sugar industry as as evil as the tobacco one. It has led to a lot of deaths and disability IMO.

What are you using as snacks? Thats my challenge! Or do you find that you don't need them once you've pushed past a certain point of weaning off the sugars?
Yes, without the carbs, I just donít get the same level of cravings for snacks - or any food, really. But if I do have a snack, I have nuts, or some cheese, or a modest amount of high fat Greek yoghurt, or a bowl of berries (strawberries, blackberries, blueberries, raspberries etc) with lashing of double cream!

But I start the day with a 3-egg cheese omelette and quite often find that at the end of the day Iíve forgotten to have lunch, but havenít really noticed.

As I say, everyone is different so VMMV. But for me, carbs make me crave more carbs, and that is about all the good they do. Iím even producing PBs with my paddling on the low-carb diet. I was worried that low carbs would mean that I felt a lack of energy when out paddling. But after a couple of weeks of adjustment, now Iím finding I actually can paddle longer and harder (up to about 1.5 hrs) than back when I was carb-loading and carrying a Camelbak full of sugary goop.

Basically, for me at least, pretty much everything I had read about, and thought was true about how I should be eating in order to stay active and maintain a sensible weight as a middle-aged man, has turned out to be not true.

Gotta keep the fibre up though if you drop the carbs, IMO. So get used to large plates of vegetables and salad. You can eat pretty much as much of that as you like though, and put butter on them.

I find that around 50g of carbs a day is about right for me. Itís not a disaster to go 75. Below 50 takes an effort to organise. Above 75 and I start feeling hungry again, put on weight, have sleepiness after meals, generally feel less sharp, and paddle slower.

Pretty sensible approach in my view. My approach was merely to aim to eat as natural and unprocessed as I could at as many meals as possible. If you avoid processed stuff, you can't go far wrong. I also have the 'water rule'. If I feel hungry, drink some water first (as hunger is often thirst in disguise).


4
Training, Diet, and Fitness / Re: Sugar is sneaky bad....
« on: January 16, 2019, 11:29:49 PM »
Good work chaps!

I've known for some time (years!) that sugar is the big cause of weight gain but have repeatedly struggled with suitable substitutions in my daily diet.

I'm not super fat but have chub and would like to trim it down. No food leaves me feeling full for very long and I like to eat. Regular grazing is hard to avoid and when I've tried to exclude that grazing, I've just found myself really really thinking about needing food!

Any tips?
Everyone has to find the right thing for them. But in my case it is a Keto-type diet, with low carbs (and definitely no sugar), and plenty of fibre, fat and protein. The fat keeps me full, and I have lost about 14lbs without even trying. For me, carbs make me hungry: All carbs seem to do is feed my hunger! Protein, fibre and fat all seem to stabilise my blood sugar, and without that see-sawing, I donít get as hungry. So, for me, itís a diet without dieting. Itís strange at first to be avoiding all bread, beer, potatoes, rice, pasta etc (and of course no sweets, cakes, or candy etc), but you soon get used to it. Now I use cream by the bucketload and lose weight! Itís strange to actually be looking for high fat foods after decades of being told it will make me fat. But actually it seems to help me lose weight, not gain it. We certainly have been totally lied to all these years, by the sugar lobby. In time we will probably come to see the sugar industry as as evil as the tobacco one. It has led to a lot of deaths and disability IMO.

This is a great anecdote and everyone should think on it. The word 'diet' is the wrong one to use in my view. Go down that road and its never going to be fun.

I just got back the states and was shocked over the use and volume of corn syrup in their products. That's just awful and its no wonder they are the fattest nation on earth.

5
Yeah, some downwind guys decide that they donít like the noise and dynamics of a hollow board, even though there are obvious advantages to the construction.

I wonder what board Bruno is going to use because I would argue he's going to want something narrower than their current range for flatwater stuff.

6
Just to bring us back on topic, I'm racing the GT this weekend at a local time trial series before I hand it back next week (after I do a review video) and have now logged 12-15 total hours on it. The weather hasn't produced the range of water states I was hoping for but I have set hell of lot of training PB's with it on flatwater and light chop with it. I'm still trying to get used to its lack of weight and inertia.......

I'm hoping to be lent the Signature 2.0 24.75 next.
What is it like upwind (say, 20 knots) in 1ft chop?

Really good and I've done a fair bit of that. The only issue is you find that its so light, it doesn't carry a lot of momentum so you have to modify your paddling stroke to be quite short and with a high rate. I find the nose design itself has a similar light splash feel as my 2017 Naish Maliko. The only thing I would say is that due to the hollow nature, any footwork feels, well, a bit odd. Partly as every movement resonates through the board like knocking on a guitar and you don't feel as physically connected as you do on a solid board (this is a bit subjective on my part though).

7
Just to bring us back on topic, I'm racing the GT this weekend at a local time trial series before I hand it back next week (after I do a review video) and have now logged 12-15 total hours on it. The weather hasn't produced the range of water states I was hoping for but I have set hell of lot of training PB's with it on flatwater and light chop with it. I'm still trying to get used to its lack of weight and inertia.......

I'm hoping to be lent the Signature 2.0 24.75 next.

8
Yes. Improvements of that size are certainly possible if you are considering the year-long improvement in a very unfit person who starts (perhaps for the first time) a well-directed fitness, technique, and nutrition program. In fact, you could get improvements that are even larger, in that person. But if you are already a world-class, adult, elite, highly trained, professional athlete like Bruno then improvements of that size are pure fantasy.

A 10% swing from off-season to peak certainly is very possible. That's quite common but you can lose a lot of your race season getting that corrected. I also read a recommendation in the book 'Racing Weight' by Matt Fitzgerald (a helpful book I'd recommend that I used to help guide my weight loss from 95kg down to 88.5kg two years ago.) that suggested that elite athletes are ok to let their weight increase by 10% in the off-season. Former Tour de France winner Jan Ullrich was renowned for liking the cakes a little too much in the winter months and would have to take quite extreme measures to hit the right weight by July.
Anyway, I'm getting off topic - yep I agree with you, it's fantasy but if he knows something I don't, I (and most of the sporting world) would be happy to listen.

9
In any sport where it can be measured, 200 watts is an admirable output over 3-4 hours. Thinking that you could push that to 220 then 242, then finally to 268 in 3 years? I know competitive cyclists that would sell their soul for that kind of increase.

I agree. I put out circa 350 watts for a 10 mile time trial. The best increase in performance I've ever gained annually (over 16 race seasons) is around 5%. I do find it easier to maintain fitness now and I can get back to my best level quite quickly but once you're past 40 and you allow that its a fight with your slowing metabolism and a fading VO2 max, the best you can hope for is that your knowledge is as cutting edge as it can get and that you can hold onto what you have.

10
Hate to admit it, but a 10% increase in performance in a year is very do-able.

Well, to discuss it, how would you quantify a 10% increase in performance ? - V02 max ? (not likely if already well trained and of a certain age), board speed ? (e.g. moving from a cruising speed of 9.5kph to 10.4kph is an unlikely power increase), bodyfat reduction ? (that's possible), functional strength (yes, but that doesn't impact directly on paddling speed wholesale).

They didn't say but I would say a 10-15% increase year on year improvement in any of my examples is unlikely at best and fraudulent at worst.

11

maybe he's found a super drug whatever that maybe? I heard performance-enhancing drugs can boost your ego. I wonder when will the SUP racing authority do drug tests from pro to club level as I'm seeing SUP athletes looking a bit like the cycling community drug issues.

Cycling is no worse than other sport. It has a bad rep but that's as its comparably so highly tested these days. You want to try sports like rugby or your local gym though....

Anyway, my original flippant comment was in reference to a 10% performance lift being larger than that of a PED - not a discussion about who could be using them. I don't think we shouldn't go down that road on a public forum otherwise it can get borderline slanderous eventually.

12
Quite. Hence the post I followed up with. 10-15% improvement a year is a ridiculous claim if you are already an elite athlete.

Cripes, you wouldn't even get that kind of lift with performance enhancing drugs let alone a one off boost by 10% in training of a well-trained athlete. The problem is, it only takes one bad anecdote like that and then you doubt the whole thing.

13
How is this going to work with the two twins working together to bring themselves and their sponsor to the podium?
It is interesting that they might accept to loose this advantage by serving two masters.

I think the only real issue for this will the 11 cities. That's going to be interesting but paddlers working together for mutual advantage in races is nothing new and 'blood is thicker than water' as they say. I suspect nothing will change and that they'll use the time trials to separate themselves and work together for the rest.

14
Bruno says ďEvery year my two trainers can improve my performance by 10-15%Ē. Ah, bless him. In a couple of years heíll be so fast that heís lapping himself.
Isn't he one of the two trainers himself though ?! Therefore he's talking about himself in the third person ?  ;D

10-15% in a year is huge. I don't know how they are quantifying that but I've only seen improvements (in terms of power output) in cycling or running to that kind of level by those who are new to a sport or were chronically overtrained before. 15% as a paddler (in terms of steady-state speed or heart rate reduction for effort) would turn me from the odd small local race winner to high international standard overnight..... and that's just for one years improvement.

15
Bruno says ďEvery year my two trainers can improve my performance by 10-15%Ē. Ah, bless him. In a couple of years heíll be so fast that heís lapping himself.

He seems like a nice guy but I called them out on their resistance-based fin training device once (The 'Push' fin) which they claimed would increase your endurance if you used it. I said that by increasing the resistance only changes the speed of the board and that you'll only increase the physiological power of the paddler if they tried to keep the board moving at the same speed (or greater) as they were when using this resistance fin (thereby merely training with greater intensity as a means to get improvement - nothing new there and nothing to do with the fin). They wouldn't have it. It may be a language translation issue but their presentation is riddled with many errors or fraudulent claims. All it is was a tidier alternative to towing tennis balls or buckets (that many of us in rowing, K1 and C1 have been doing for decades). Their product does do this in a much neater and cleaner way and is a nice product but the accompanying text intentionally over-complicates it and makes it read like they have discovered something that nobody knew about (note: the text has been rewritten recently).

They are awesome athletes - no doubt - but I'd be very cautious at anything beyond that.

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