Standup Zone Forum

General Category => Gear Talk => Topic started by: spirit4earth on March 14, 2019, 02:50:51 PM

Title: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on March 14, 2019, 02:50:51 PM
Have any of you ever transported your board on the car roof for long distances in the summer?  Thinking about cross-country trips, when it can get blazing hot.  Are there any super-protective board bags as far as heat protection?
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: nalu-sup on March 14, 2019, 07:26:36 PM
Our SIC F16s live on top of our vans all summer on Maui. We talked to the guys who build the custom SIC boards on Maui, and they recommended against any sealed bags that would be exposed to sun or heat. I ended up buying a couple of "Kore-Dry" bags from Ralph at Sup-position, one of the sponsors of this site. The bags are a soft, thin, but strong material that just covers the side of the boards exposed to the sun, and lets them breath. There is an elastic border that wraps around the rails and holds the bag in place, even at highway speeds. They have worked great for us, and are like new after two summers in the Maui sun. The only downside is that if the bags get wet in the rain, the water stretches them out and they start flapping badly at highway speeds. They are clearly not designed for shipping or ding protection, but for sun and heat. We have been very happy with them for our purposes.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: JimK on March 15, 2019, 08:56:58 AM
The Kore bags are nice but long haul (higher Speed Driving and rain will stretch them) There are a couple opf Day bag companies that will offer reflective bags with some ding protection.
How big is your board (length & width)

jimK
Extreme Windsurfing
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on March 15, 2019, 09:38:33 AM
Iím not sure on the board yet, but most likely 11x30.  Long haul driving at high speeds in hot sun.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Bean on March 15, 2019, 11:55:49 AM
Just a couple of thoughts. 

Given a choice, lighter colors will naturally stay cooler and a passive vent (most boards these days) is a plus.

If the board you end up with has a screw-in vent, remove it when the board will be racked on the car for more than a half hour or so, on hot days.

If it has a passive vent, (gore-tex) I would leave it alone and let it do it's thing.

If you end up falling in love with a dark board, a light colored day-bag or cover will help.  Just don't bag the board while its still wet.  And, you don't need to bag it if you are going to be driving (unless it's bumper to bumper).

Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Bulky on March 15, 2019, 12:09:18 PM
+1 on the Koredry topless board bags.  My 14' Carbon board is on the roof of my truck more days than not.  No worries with it being in direct sunlight.  I've tested the KoreDry bag with a thermometer in direct sun.  Don't remember the exact numbers but it stayed well below the temp where you need to worry about board damage.  I guess they may flap around abit like has been said above, but they're quiet--not like a flapping zipper or handle on a reflective bag thumping at highway speeds.

Good tip from Bean about the vent.  I would be especially cognizant of that if you're changing elevations.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on March 15, 2019, 01:39:42 PM
Just a couple of thoughts. 

Given a choice, lighter colors will naturally stay cooler and a passive vent (most boards these days) is a plus.

If the board you end up with has a screw-in vent, remove it when the board will be racked on the car for more than a half hour or so, on hot days.

If it has a passive vent, (gore-tex) I would leave it alone and let it do it's thing.

If you end up falling in love with a dark board, a light colored day-bag or cover will help.  Just don't bag the board while its still wet.  And, you don't need to bag it if you are going to be driving (unless it's bumper to bumper).

Does this mean itís better to put the bare board on the roof while cruising in the heat?  Why would bumper-to-bumper make a difference?  (It probably will be as long as my little car.). Thanks for the vent tip, too!
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on March 15, 2019, 01:42:56 PM
I normally go 80 in the interstate, but I guess Iíll have to slow down if I have an 11 or 12 foot board on the roof.  Whatever sun/heat protection I use would have to withstand high speeds for up to 12 hours.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: OkiWild on March 15, 2019, 04:36:36 PM
Why would bumper-to-bumper make a difference?

Convection. While you're moving, wind over the board cools it.

I live in the sub-tropics, and boards on the roof hasn't been a problem as long as the bags are vented. When driving (super slow traffic here), I'll have the board unzipped a little at the forward point, usually fins-first, so the fin slot in the bag might be left open, and air will flow out the vent in the bag nose. When parked, I'll open all the vents in the bag, fin slot, handle slot, and even unzip the entire nose area.

I once left my Kazuma 12-6 race baord in an FCS bag for a day, wet, and zipped up. It caused some weird damage to the bottom of the board. Like something came out of the epoxy, and some discoloration. A little sanding fixed it, but still...pretty careful about heat now...

Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: LeeBee on March 17, 2019, 08:33:51 AM
I travel with some large boards (Mistral Unlimiteds & 14 ft. race boards) for long distances at high speeds in strong sunlight. While for a 11 ft. board the typical 36" spacing on roof cross bars is OK when you get to 14' or longer and especially with a cover, I would start to get nervous. I use a Goodboy Kayak rack with the flatter V bars and their shock cord tie downs vs. straps. To me tie downs on a fragile race board is an accident waiting to happen.  I run a double set with the second one with slightly less tension as a back up. Kore Dry makes a fine product, and would not recommend the more protective covers for travel, as they can become a disaster in a heavy rain storm, as they can fill up with water.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on March 17, 2019, 08:42:43 AM
I travel with some large boards (Mistral Unlimiteds & 14 ft. race boards) for long distances at high speeds in strong sunlight. While for a 11 ft. board the typical 36" spacing on roof cross bars is OK when you get to 14' or longer and especially with a cover, I would start to get nervous. I use a Goodboy Kayak rack with the flatter V bars and their shock cord tie downs vs. straps. To me tie downs on a fragile race board is an accident waiting to happen.  I run a double set with the second one with slightly less tension as a back up. Kore Dry makes a fine product, and would not recommend the more protective covers for travel, as they can become a disaster in a heavy rain storm, as they can fill up with water.

I do worry about ďlift offĒ!  So the Kore Dry covers are sufficient for keeping the boards protected from the sun?  How do you secure them on the board so they donĎt come off when they stretch due to rain?

How do you use the V-bars with your flat boards?
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: surfcowboy on March 17, 2019, 08:58:11 AM
Sorry to the folks that sell bags but you should have no issues driving as long as the boards are white bottom and vented.

I have left my board on my car for a week in so cal summer (Valley) with no ill effects. If you have a color, Iíd honestly spray the bottom white before Iíd cook it in a closed bag in desert heat.

Anyone here have any actual experience to refute this? Iím betting that hundreds of thousands of boards travel bagless all summer.

Again, this changes if itís not white but a white board will be cool when you touch it. Try it for a day in your yard in the sun and see.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on March 17, 2019, 09:30:25 AM
Sorry to the folks that sell bags but you should have no issues driving as long as the boards are white bottom and vented.

I have left my board on my car for a week in so cal summer (Valley) with no ill effects. If you have a color, Iíd honestly spray the bottom white before Iíd cook it in a closed bag in desert heat.

Anyone here have any actual experience to refute this? Iím betting that hundreds of thousands of boards travel bagless all summer.

Again, this changes if itís not white but a white board will be cool when you touch it. Try it for a day in your yard in the sun and see.

I hear you!  Iím not getting a BIC, but I asked Jimmy Blakeney about this several months ago, and he said the BIC boards are good to go on the roof.  Iíd want to have some rock and bug protection, though.  My car was plastered in bugs after driving cross-country. 
I like to hear first-hand accounts like yours.  Real-world experience.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: mrbig on March 17, 2019, 09:52:35 AM
Both of my 404 boards spend a lot of time on my Trac racks.

Matt white Sunny side up no issues. Green side up not so much. A slight fade.

Also have a bag that I used when taking them to races, but that is no longer a concern.

It would be fun to be in Cal and race in the 70+
class..
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: rbgar on March 17, 2019, 10:10:39 AM
I ordered a white day bag from Vitamin Blue for car and boat transfer!
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on March 17, 2019, 11:41:01 AM
Would reflective material be even better than white?  Iím wondering if thereís a way to rig a reflectix top cover.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: rbgar on March 17, 2019, 01:42:21 PM
Would reflective material be even better than white?  Iím wondering if thereís a way to rig a reflectix top cover.

Saw a study that shows white is the best
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: mrbig on March 17, 2019, 01:51:24 PM
Have a bag with reflective shiny. Totally unscientific, but real world experience, revealed that it was hotter. Shiny up sizzle. Shiny down made in the shade.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: clay on March 17, 2019, 04:21:52 PM
My 2 cents is stay away from bungee or elastic straps. 

I drove through Sacramento summer heat and traffic on the way to Tahoe and when I arrived I had 4 crushed rails where the straps touched the corners of the board.

I have used these same straps all winter and summer on the Nor Cal coast with no issues.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: JimK on March 18, 2019, 08:18:27 AM
Gotta PLUS1 to Clay Those straps (bungee) are dangerous I had several (like 3) have them fail and destroyed more than 3 boards. I highly discourage there use for highway driving

JImK
Extreme Windsurfing
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: mrbig on March 18, 2019, 08:36:03 AM
Padded locking  straps. Never fail. Don't have to make them crazy tight. You can lock for serious protection or not.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Bean on March 18, 2019, 08:37:53 AM
Thats a good PSA Clay and Jim.

For anyone who is not quite sure about what might have happened to Clay's board here is what I would assume happened.  As Clay gained altitude on his way to Tahoe (into thin air) his board was loosing pressure at a much slower rate than the surrounding air.  In effect, due to the decreased outside air pressure, the board balooned and crushed its rails against the tie downs.  (although, it could also have been temeprature related)

Most decent tie downs combined with proper rack pads will give you just the right amount of stretch to handle slight pressure changes, whether altitude or temperature related.


Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on March 18, 2019, 09:16:11 AM
Thats a good PSA Clay and Jim.

For anyone who is not quite sure about what might have happened to Clay's board here is what I would assume happened.  As Clay gained altitude on his way to Tahoe (into thin air) his board was loosing pressure at a much slower rate than the surrounding air.  In effect, due to the decreased outside air pressure, the board balooned and crushed its rails against the tie downs.  (although, it could also have been temeprature related)

Most decent tie downs combined with proper rack pads will give you just the right amount of stretch to handle slight pressure changes, whether altitude or temperature related.

I wouldn't have thought of that!
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: mrbig on March 18, 2019, 12:44:57 PM
+1 Jim K. Bungee cords very dangerous i.e. unsafe at any speed!

Or am I the only one, besides Jim, who has seen multiple boards flying around from failing, or stretching, bungee cords?

Nevah, evah, don't do it!
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Bulky on March 18, 2019, 01:22:13 PM

I do worry about ďlift offĒ!  So the Kore Dry covers are sufficient for keeping the boards protected from the sun?  How do you secure them on the board so they donĎt come off when they stretch due to rain?

How do you use the V-bars with your flat boards?

I've never had a problem with a Kore Dry cover coming off.  If sized correctly the elastic is plenty strong.  And since it's under the tie downs it wouldn't go anywhere even if it did some how lift off.

I know black boards can look really cool, but I just don't get it.  They can get so hot even just sitting on the sand...
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on April 06, 2019, 11:23:26 AM
The roof rack on my Fit has the bars spaced only 30Ē apart.  Thatís not much of an 11í board.  When I carry kayaks, I loosely tie the bow and stern.  What about a board?  How could I secure the front so I t doesnít fly up and snap in half?
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Wetstuff on April 06, 2019, 11:59:29 AM
s4e...  I wouldn't worry too much, the forces able to break the board likely would also be giving your car the 'fits'.  I had a young lady buy a practice shell from me a few years ago.  Her first drive with it on her roof was 500+ miles back to Buffalo NY.  I made her a bridle so the boat would not start to 'helicopter' at 70mph  ..and a couple of other bits. 

I do not think you would need anything as complete but, I'd be happy to make you the front hood bits and a cinch if you rode fin-forward   ...a freebie, 'friend of the forum' discount, so I don't break any advertising rules. (besides, I am not interested in making more)

Jim



Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Wetstuff on April 06, 2019, 12:03:04 PM
The 'attachment' process confuses my Mac.  I cannot see a preview, so do not know whether an attachment works or no?





Jim



Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Night Wing on April 06, 2019, 12:16:37 PM
@ spirit4earth

I have my old Thule kayak roof racks with two, 58" long steel bars. These racks (with bars) are fitted to the roof of the cab of my 2001 Chevy Silverado. From the outside edge on one steel bar to the outside edge of the second steel bar, the distance is 29".

Over these two steel bars, I have a pair of 42" soft roof rack pads that fit over both steel bars so they don't cause any damage to my 11'1" board. I place my sup deck pad side down on the soft roof rack pads so my fins stick straight up towards the sky. The tail end (with fins) of my board is over my windshield.

The two tie downs I use to secure the board to the steel bars are a pair of Kanulocks. I cinch the straps of each Kanulock "snugly" so the board does not move, but the straps aren't "strangling" my board either. If you tighten the straps too tightly, you can damage the rails of the board

I have no problem going down the highway to Surfside, Texas with my 11'1" sup, traveling the 117 miles from my home to Surfside, at a speed of 70 mph.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Night Wing on April 06, 2019, 12:20:26 PM
The 'attachment' process confuses my Mac.  I cannot see a preview, so do not know whether an attachment works or no?

It isn't your Mac. The "Zoner" site does not show previews of photos, when it comes to attachments, so you will never see a preview. This is a flaw (or bad design) in this forum's software.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on April 06, 2019, 12:29:18 PM
s4e...  I wouldn't worry too much, the forces able to break the board likely would also be giving your car the 'fits'.  I had a young lady buy a practice shell from me a few years ago.  Her first drive with it on her roof was 500+ miles back to Buffalo NY.  I made her a bridle so the boat would not start to 'helicopter' at 70mph  ..and a couple of other bits. 

I do not think you would need anything as complete but, I'd be happy to make you the front hood bits and a cinch if you rode fin-forward   ...a freebie, 'friend of the forum' discount, so I don't break any advertising rules. (besides, I am not interested in making more)

Jim

Thatís an impressive rig!  You made those tie-downs??  Cool!  Iíd love to have oneó-Iíll pm you.
One of my Q-towers is so old that it wonít lock anymore, soIkm scouring Craigslist to find some used ones.  I have 2 new ones and 2 old ones.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on April 06, 2019, 12:31:03 PM
@ spirit4earth

I have my old Thule kayak roof racks with two, 58" long steel bars. These racks (with bars) are fitted to the roof of the cab of my 2001 Chevy Silverado. From the outside edge on one steel bar to the outside edge of the second steel bar, the distance is 29".

Over these two steel bars, I have a pair of 42" soft roof rack pads that fit over both steel bars so they don't cause any damage to my 11'1" board. I place my sup deck pad side down on the soft roof rack pads so my fins stick straight up towards the sky. The tail end (with fins) of my board is over my windshield.

The two tie downs I use to secure the board to the steel bars are a pair of Kanulocks. I cinch the straps of each Kanulock "snugly" so the board does not move, but the straps aren't "strangling" my board either. If you tighten the straps too tightly, you can damage the rails of the board

I have no problem going down the highway to Surfside, Texas with my 11'1" sup, traveling the 117 miles from my home to Surfside, at a speed of 70 mph.

Thatís great!  Do you have the board centered on the bars, or is more of it going over the bed of your truck?  I have some of those crossbar pads, too, which Iíll use on longer trips. 
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Night Wing on April 06, 2019, 04:02:36 PM
@ spirit4earth

My 11'1" board is "mostly" centered on the bars because when I travel to go sup surfing, I travel with the 4 fins attached to the tail end of the board so the tail end of the board is heavier than the nose end.

Since the light is fading fast where live, I'll try and get a photo of it so my strap tying won't be how I normally do it. But you'll get the idea.

Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Night Wing on April 06, 2019, 04:46:01 PM
@ spirit4earth

Well, I had to race the fading light of day and a fast approaching thunderstorm. Below is a photo of my 11'1" One World resting on the soft roof rack pads attached and tied to the roof racks (via my Kanulocks) on the cab roof of my truck.

Since I can't preview the size of the attachment, this photo will either be too small, too big or "just right" as Goldilocks would say.  ;)  So here goes.

Looks like the photo took. And if you left click on the photo, it will enlarge a little larger.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on April 06, 2019, 04:49:47 PM
@ spirit4earth

Well, I had to race the fading light of day and a fast approaching thunderstorm. Below is a photo of my 11'1" One World resting on the soft roof rack pads attached and tied to the roof racks (via my Kanulocks) on the cab roof of my truck.

Since I can't preview the size of the attachment, this photo will either be too small, too big or "just right" as Goldilocks would say.  ;)  So here goes.

That looks good!  It appears to be pretty much centered on the racks.  Good to know thereís no problem with air lifting the front end.  Nice truck, too!  Iím going to check out the straps, as well.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on April 06, 2019, 04:52:29 PM
Night Wing, it. Looks like those straps canít be tied around themselves on the outside of the lock.  Is that true?
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Night Wing on April 06, 2019, 04:59:20 PM
Night Wing, it. Looks like those straps canít be tied around themselves on the outside of the lock.  Is that true?

They can be tied on the outside of the locks. My Kanulocks straps, each one is 13' long. In this photo, I had to hurry because of the fast approaching thunderstorm so attention to "small details" had to take a back seat to the lightning from the thunderstorm.

Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on April 06, 2019, 05:07:48 PM
Night Wing, it. Looks like those straps canít be tied around themselves on the outside of the lock.  Is that true?

They can be tied on the outside of the locks. My Kanulocks straps, each one is 13' long. In this photo, I had to hurry because of the fast approaching thunderstorm so attention to "small details" had to take a back seat to the lightning from the thunderstorm.

Understood!  ⚡️⚡️
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: jsb on April 07, 2019, 09:23:21 AM
s4e...  I wouldn't worry too much, the forces able to break the board likely would also be giving your car the 'fits'.  I had a young lady buy a practice shell from me a few years ago.  Her first drive with it on her roof was 500+ miles back to Buffalo NY.  I made her a bridle so the boat would not start to 'helicopter' at 70mph  ..and a couple of other bits. 

I do not think you would need anything as complete but, I'd be happy to make you the front hood bits and a cinch if you rode fin-forward   ...a freebie, 'friend of the forum' discount, so I don't break any advertising rules. (besides, I am not interested in making more)

Jim

Jim-

That's a pretty slick setup.  I need to build something similar for myself, as my roof bars are only spaced 30" apart.  Until this past spring, I was driving a 2001 Civic, which had tie-downs built into the frame, but I now have a 2013 Outback, and there's no place to secure bow and stern tie-downs. 

It's hard to tell from the photos -- are the attachments that go under the front hood and the rear hatch:

   1.  A loop, that loops around the hood/hatch?
   2.  Two separate "plugs", that are big enough that they can't be pulled through the cracks when the hood/hatch are closed?

Either way, is there a commercial source for this part of the build, or did you make them from scratch?

Thanks,
Jon
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Quickbeam on April 07, 2019, 09:42:49 AM
s4e...  I wouldn't worry too much, the forces able to break the board likely would also be giving your car the 'fits'.  I had a young lady buy a practice shell from me a few years ago.  Her first drive with it on her roof was 500+ miles back to Buffalo NY.  I made her a bridle so the boat would not start to 'helicopter' at 70mph  ..and a couple of other bits. 

I do not think you would need anything as complete but, I'd be happy to make you the front hood bits and a cinch if you rode fin-forward   ...a freebie, 'friend of the forum' discount, so I don't break any advertising rules. (besides, I am not interested in making more)

Jim

Jim-

That's a pretty slick setup.  I need to build something similar for myself, as my roof bars are only spaced 30" apart.  Until this past spring, I was driving a 2001 Civic, which had tie-downs built into the frame, but I now have a 2013 Outback, and there's no place to secure bow and stern tie-downs. 

It's hard to tell from the photos -- are the attachments that go under the front hood and the rear hatch:

   1.  A loop, that loops around the hood/hatch?
   2.  Two separate "plugs", that are big enough that they can't be pulled through the cracks when the hood/hatch are closed?

Either way, is there a commercial source for this part of the build, or did you make them from scratch?

Thanks,
Jon

Hi jsb. Re your question on attachments that go under the hood and the back hatch of Wetstuffís vehicle. Iím not sure exactly what he is using, but I have very similar attachments I use for my kayak tie downs. The ones I have were available commercially but I canít remember where I got them. Iíve had them for a number of years and think I bought them online from a sporting goods store in Seattle. Sorry I canít be more helpful than that. The ones I have, have a loop on one end and a grommet on the other. On the grommet end, you just bolt it down somewhere under the hood and then the loop end comes out of the hood and you string your tie down through it.

O.K., Google is great. I found them. Here are the ones I've got (https://www.amazon.com/Sherpak-Built-U-S-Hood-Loops/dp/B0024ALDMS). Hope this helps.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on April 07, 2019, 09:48:29 AM
s4e...  I wouldn't worry too much, the forces able to break the board likely would also be giving your car the 'fits'.  I had a young lady buy a practice shell from me a few years ago.  Her first drive with it on her roof was 500+ miles back to Buffalo NY.  I made her a bridle so the boat would not start to 'helicopter' at 70mph  ..and a couple of other bits. 

I do not think you would need anything as complete but, I'd be happy to make you the front hood bits and a cinch if you rode fin-forward   ...a freebie, 'friend of the forum' discount, so I don't break any advertising rules. (besides, I am not interested in making more)

Jim

Jim-

That's a pretty slick setup.  I need to build something similar for myself, as my roof bars are only spaced 30" apart.  Until this past spring, I was driving a 2001 Civic, which had tie-downs built into the frame, but I now have a 2013 Outback, and there's no place to secure bow and stern tie-downs. 

It's hard to tell from the photos -- are the attachments that go under the front hood and the rear hatch:

   1.  A loop, that loops around the hood/hatch?
   2.  Two separate "plugs", that are big enough that they can't be pulled through the cracks when the hood/hatch are closed?

Either way, is there a commercial source for this part of the build, or did you make them from scratch?

Thanks,
Jon

Hi jsb. Re your question on attachments that go under the hood and the back hatch of Wetstuffís vehicle. Iím not sure exactly what he is using, but I have very similar attachments I use for my kayak tie downs. The ones I have were available commercially but I canít remember where I got them. Iíve had them for a number of years and think I bought them online from a sporting goods store in Seattle. Sorry I canít be more helpful than that. The ones I have, have a loop on one end and a grommet on the other. On the grommet end, you just bolt it down somewhere under the hood and then the loop end comes out of the hood and you string your tie down through it.

O.K., Google is great. I found them. Here are the ones I've got (https://www.amazon.com/Sherpak-Built-U-S-Hood-Loops/dp/B0024ALDMS). Hope this helps.

Yakima makes something that works, too.

Iím interested in the part that goes over the board to hold nose and tail.  Very cool!
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Wetstuff on April 07, 2019, 11:39:07 AM
Thanks, s4e and John.  I'll whip up a pair tomorrow. They are pretty simple when you see them  ...even w/o proper tools.

Jim

...thanks to NW, I won't worry about 'previews'. 

...but, one should not pass up an opportunity to start a fight...   NW, I think traditional strapping is perhaps wrong.

My Acura wagon and MB SUV bars are spaced ~40", but that's not terribly important.   I'd guess 95% of the time (with only one board) I do not strap the rear.*  Rather, I double strap the front crossbar. (I make my straps) The board does not move, so I found a rear strap unnecessary for the 45min ride there-n-back.

*A few years ago, I used a rear bungee to keep it centered, like on this piece of floating tarmac   ...'not really needed.

Jim

Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on April 07, 2019, 11:46:01 AM
Thanks, s4e and John.  I'll whip up a pair tomorrow. They are pretty simple when you see them  ...even w/o proper tools.

Jim

...thanks to NW, I won't worry about 'previews'. 

...but, one should not pass up an opportunity to start a fight...   NW, I think traditional strapping is perhaps wrong.

My Acura wagon and MB SUV bars are spaced ~40", but that's not terribly important.   I'd guess 95% of the time (with only one board) I do not strap the rear.*  Rather, I double strap the front crossbar. (I make my straps) The board does not move, so I found a rear strap unnecessary for the 45min ride there-n-back.

*A few years ago, I used a rear bungee to keep it centered, like on this piece of floating tarmac   ...'not really needed.

Jim

Jim, if anyone is reading this thread, I think youíll get some responses about that!
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: jsb on April 07, 2019, 02:04:14 PM

O.K., Google is great. I found them. Here are the ones I've got (https://www.amazon.com/Sherpak-Built-U-S-Hood-Loops/dp/B0024ALDMS). Hope this helps.

Quickbeam-

Mahalo for taking the extra time to look that up.  I appreciate it!

Jon
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Quickbeam on April 07, 2019, 02:29:43 PM

O.K., Google is great. I found them. Here are the ones I've got (https://www.amazon.com/Sherpak-Built-U-S-Hood-Loops/dp/B0024ALDMS). Hope this helps.

Quickbeam-

Mahalo for taking the extra time to look that up.  I appreciate it!

Jon

You're welcome. Hope they work for you!
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Night Wing on April 07, 2019, 04:03:20 PM
My Acura wagon and MB SUV bars are spaced ~40", but that's not terribly important.   I'd guess 95% of the time (with only one board) I do not strap the rear.*  Rather, I double strap the front crossbar. (I make my straps) The board does not move, so I found a rear strap unnecessary for the 45min ride there-n-back.

Jim

I'm just old fashioned.

In my photo, I had to hurry because of the fast approaching thunderstorm and it's lightning bolts. The front strap is double strapped over the top of the first crossbar closest to my windshield. When I was tying the strap, the lightning was getting real close so I just squeezed the two straps together so it looks like it is only one strap and not two straps. If I had the time, I would have both straps tied correctly where both straps on the crossbars would look like the straps on the second crossbar over the extended cab closest to the camper shell.

My board does not move back and forth because the soft roof rack pads do allow anything to slide forwards or backwards. No side to side (lateral) movement because the middle of the board is 30" wide and where both straps are tied across the board and to the roof racks, are "less" than 30" in width.

As soon as I got the board tied onto both roof racks; I ran over to my wife's iPad, snapped two pictures, checked to make sure both pictures took, untied everything, put my board back into the garage as well as the Kanulocks and soft roof rack pads. As soon as I did, the sky opened up with a torrent of rain.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on April 07, 2019, 04:28:45 PM
NW,  I remember those crazy storms from my Texas days.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Night Wing on April 07, 2019, 07:29:35 PM

My board does not move back and forth because the soft roof rack pads do allow anything to slide forwards or backwards.

I left out a word in the above sentence. It should have read:

My board does not move back and forth because the soft roof rack pads do "not" allow anything to slide forwards or backwards.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: krash on April 08, 2019, 06:58:07 AM
Not followed this thread for a while... but I have a small car, Civic, with short roof line. My racks are only 18" apart, and have a set of pads so as not to damage the board. Always strap 2 lines across at each rack, but so much SUP is forward and back the wind does grab its fair share, most SUP's do not have bow/stern connect points. I use the Yak SUPBrah to give nme additional needed security when travelling, I don;t go slow and we do get some serious winds not to mention cross winds when passing a tractor trailer.

The loops the person was asking about I've seen in 2 varieties, the simple set Thule 529, with a gromet you attach to a bolt under your hood, unfortunately some cars like my Civic don;t have a convienet bolt to attach to... Thule makes the 530, and others too,  set of simple loops with a T that you just set under the hood and close it. This si good if you have a contact/connection point on you SUP but without one I use the YakBrah. I generally travel with the board facing forward.
Both styles form other manufacturer's, gromet and T block are also available on the REI site.


My carrier vehicle. loaded and ready to roll 12'6" SUP, with the SupBrah, securing the bow & stern. (Actually a pretty simple setup that a DIY'r could easily make with some line) It takes me less that 15 minutes to load or unload. Been using this system 2+ years and never an issue.
(https://www.standupzone.com/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi546.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fhh410%2Fsandyw371%2FIMGP0946.jpg&hash=62250a73c63754d94615bdbba31e0351)



Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Wetstuff on April 08, 2019, 09:08:24 AM
Ok.... I gave myself 20min ...and changed up mid-stream.   My first instinct was a basic piece of foam like small pipe insulation with a bit of webbing ..grommet at the end.  Done. 

No - no metal ..for sure not on top. I use a soldering stick for almost everything when it comes to webbing. So I conjured up this ...but, I don't like it. Polypropylene webbing 'fuzes' wonderfully.  You don't really need to sew it, but you can't hack-at-it like this if you want to put tension on it because it is not evenly fuzed.

Jim



Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Wetstuff on April 08, 2019, 09:21:45 AM
Round two...  I needed a thin heat transfer system to get it 'mostly' even.  It was in the knife drawer. Any flame heat source will work.  And, to prevent any slippage, I punched a hole thru the tubing to lock it laterally.  I have not tried it ..to see if the length of the webbing is ok, but I mainly wanted to show how I did it.

If you have any idea, you would like me to try - I got plenty of this c'hit.     Jim

Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Bean on April 08, 2019, 10:07:18 AM
... I have a small car, Civic, with short roof line. My racks are only 18" apart, ...

Have you considered the Thule 487 - Traverse Short Roof Adapter?  That would get you to about 28".
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on April 08, 2019, 04:58:30 PM
Wetstuff......so the nylon is melted together, not sewn?  Is this as strong as sewing?
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: krash on April 09, 2019, 07:49:41 AM
... I have a small car, Civic, with short roof line. My racks are only 18" apart, ...

Have you considered the Thule 487 - Traverse Short Roof Adapter?  That would get you to about 28".

I considered it with my first Civic a 2001, especially after reading the suggestion fomr Yakima and Thule, but ignored the warnings and went with bow & stern lines.. my Civic all alos had sun roofs also. I think when I ordered the Aero Bars I had to pretend my car was a 4dr to get their app to allow me to buy without that adapter.
I've had 3 2dr Civics, 2001, 2012, & 2008, carried Canoes, Kayaks, and SUP for many years many many miles at hi-way speeds and above, usually an hour plus trip for me to the launch site with no issues..

The onle issue I ever had was once with my pre-2001 I had a '91 4 dr Accord, and an old 16' Mohawk Canoe, was using only the small rectangular foam blocks that slip on the gunwale and no center side to side strap... always just strapped it down with bow & stern lines.... mad e a 2+ hour trip into Evergaldes National Park and on the way out on the lonely 2 lane rough blacktop got hit by a surprise Sunny South Florida torrential 10 minute downpour with very high cross wind mini-tornado that blew the canoe over the side off the roof, the mirror caught it and stopped it fomr hitting the ground... ever since that experience I always have center straps side to side and bow/stern lines. Fortunately Hondas have 3 tie down points 2 in front under-behind the bumber and one center rear attached to solid mount points.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on May 13, 2019, 12:34:24 PM
Hi folks!  Can you throw out suggestions again about the best way to get the board on the roof in the wind?  Thanks!
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: OkiWild on May 14, 2019, 12:27:22 AM
Hi folks!  Can you throw out suggestions again about the best way to get the board on the roof in the wind?  Thanks!

Two people  :D
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Wetstuff on May 14, 2019, 05:58:43 AM
My thought exactly, Oki...   Never be too proud to ask for a little help. Contact with tarmac is a lot more impactful than a nick in your pride.


Jim
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on May 14, 2019, 06:31:00 AM
I wish I did have someone to help, and someone to paddle with!
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Bean on May 14, 2019, 06:55:54 AM
When it's windy I will park further away to get a spot that offers a little wind block.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: sflinux on May 14, 2019, 07:21:25 AM
https://vimeo.com/128725272 (https://vimeo.com/128725272)
This is the technique I have been using (note: I have dinged the tail of my 11' board on the ground using this technique during a strong gust):
When it is windy, have the tie downs straps within reach.  Have something soft on the ground under the tail of your board.  I wear the Beasho SUP shoulder strap, I put the nose of the board on my front roof crossbar, then temporarily secure the Beasho carrying strap around my roof rack.  Then I carefully lift the tail of the board onto the roof rack.  I have one hand on the board, and use the other to put the straps on the board.   I admit that I use kanulocks with the traditional tie down pattern.  Once you can get one tie down secure, you can breathe a sigh of relief.  But when it is windy, this method looks faster and easier:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4QOMAJvAAU (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4QOMAJvAAU)
When it gets windy, I prefer using a shorter board, which eventually defers to kitesurfing.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on May 20, 2019, 12:18:13 PM
https://vimeo.com/128725272 (https://vimeo.com/128725272)
This is the technique I have been using (note: I have dinged the tail of my 11' board on the ground using this technique during a strong gust):
When it is windy, have the tie downs straps within reach.  Have something soft on the ground under the tail of your board.  I wear the Beasho SUP shoulder strap, I put the nose of the board on my front roof crossbar, then temporarily secure the Beasho carrying strap around my roof rack.  Then I carefully lift the tail of the board onto the roof rack.  I have one hand on the board, and use the other to put the straps on the board.   I admit that I use kanulocks with the traditional tie down pattern.  Once you can get one tie down secure, you can breathe a sigh of relief.  But when it is windy, this method looks faster and easier:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4QOMAJvAAU (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4QOMAJvAAU)
When it gets windy, I prefer using a shorter board, which eventually defers to kitesurfing.

So with Robertís 30 second method, is the only place where the strap is OUTSIDE the towers on the far front, where he first throws the strap over?
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on May 20, 2019, 12:19:40 PM
Nothing to do with ďsummerĒ, but Iím curious....
Does anyone know of a board EVER snapping in half due to lift while driving?
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Night Wing on May 20, 2019, 01:36:56 PM
@ spirit4earth

In this topic thread, go back to Reply #33 from me which has a photo of my 11'1' One World on the roof of my truck's cab. My board is transported "deckpad side down on my padded roof racks with fins over my truck's windshield, pointed up vertically towards the sky".

When transported this way, there is "no lift". The lift occurs when some people transport the board with "deckpad side up with the rocker of the nose pointing upward over the windshield.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: RideTheGlide on May 20, 2019, 05:50:55 PM
@ spirit4earth

In this topic thread, go back to Reply #33 from me which has a photo of my 11'1' One World on the roof of my truck's cab. My board is transported "deckpad side down on my padded roof racks with fins over my truck's windshield, pointed up vertically towards the sky".

When transported this way, there is "no lift". The lift occurs when some people transport the board with "deckpad side up with the rocker of the nose pointing upward over the windshield.
I have been transporting my 14' board deckpad down. I think the primary force of lift I get is windshield deflection. I run lines from tie down points. Mine are very secure; they are basically leash attach points (same hardware) inset into the board. When I kayaked a lot, the "rule" was to use a rack to keep the boat off the car and lines to keep it on the car. My big Glide is practically a boat. I do strap it securely to the rack, but don't want to test just how secure the rack is.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: spirit4earth on May 20, 2019, 05:59:09 PM
@ spirit4earth

In this topic thread, go back to Reply #33 from me which has a photo of my 11'1' One World on the roof of my truck's cab. My board is transported "deckpad side down on my padded roof racks with fins over my truck's windshield, pointed up vertically towards the sky".

When transported this way, there is "no lift". The lift occurs when some people transport the board with "deckpad side up with the rocker of the nose pointing upward over the windshield.
I have been transporting my 14' board deckpad down. I think the primary force of lift I get is windshield deflection. I run lines from tie down points. Mine are very secure; they are basically leash attach points (same hardware) inset into the board. When I kayaked a lot, the "rule" was to use a rack to keep the boat off the car and lines to keep it on the car. My big Glide is practically a boat. I do strap it securely to the rack, but don't want to test just how secure the rack is.

Thatís what Iíve done with kayaks.  Wetstuff is helping me with  system that can keep the tail from lifting too much.  I have a very slanted windshieldó-lots of wind coming up from it.
Title: Re: Roof transport in summer
Post by: Night Wing on May 20, 2019, 11:08:39 PM
@ spirit4earth

My roof racks are Thule roof racks (towers and bars) bought back in 2003. They are not aluminum. They are steel. I travel down the highway on Interstate I-45 south to Galveston doing 75 mph. Never have any problems with the way I strap both of my boards to my roof racks in conjunction with high speed highway driving.