Standup Zone Forum

General Category => General Discussion => Topic started by: Night Wing on February 10, 2019, 07:29:55 AM

Title: Tiny Waves
Post by: Night Wing on February 10, 2019, 07:29:55 AM
Most of the time the waves on the upper Texas coast are small waves. Maybe 1.5'-2' in height. But there are days where we have "tiny waves". These waves are basically slow rollers and they range in height from 9"-1'. The kind of tiny slow roller waves found in the video below.

BTW, the video below is about a vacation spot in Bali (Indonesia), but this vacation spot is not the point. The point is the tiny waves where the married couple are sup surfing these waves in rented 10' x 33" sups.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDyCnVFQTas

Sometimes the forecasted wave height for the upper Texas coast is wrong. Instead of small to moderate wave heights, we get "tiny waves". I've found my 11'1" x 30" @ 173 liters One World can easily sup surf these waves with me and my 144 lbs (at the moment) physical weight.

When these types of waves happen, I sometimes have the entire beach to myself surfing wise since all the prone surfers are riding 6'-8' short surfboards where their volume of liters is between 70-100 liters and their boards cannot really support their weight between 175-210 lbs when these tiny waves occur.

In the next video below you can see some of the tiny slow roller waves far off the beach. This video was taken from a drone at Drum Point at Surfside, Tx so you can see these tiny waves.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mz72T-aGY3w

Now how I do I know which of my two sups to take to the upper Texas coast so I take the right sup? I have streaming webcam links to the beaches where I sup surf and some of these beaches have webcams where there is enough light to see from houses, piers, etc; at nightime (3:00 AM) which helps me choose the right sup since it takes me between 2-2.5 hours of one way drive time to reach these beaches.

Some of these streaming webcams are below and I've chosen these since they do not need Flash since some of you on this site do not and will not use Flash.

Take note. You won't see any tiny waves (today as I type this post) since the wind is up and coming inshore from the East at 19 mph.

https://www.bolivarpeninsulatexas.com/Webcams/Sunrise-Beach

https://www.bolivarpeninsulatexas.com/Webcams/Bluewater-Beach

https://www.bolivarpeninsulatexas.com/Webcams/Crystal-Beach-Surf

https://www.galveston.com/east-beach-videocam/

Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: Wetstuff on February 10, 2019, 12:32:27 PM
Winger...  You ch'ure that's got enough 'push'?  Lucky, you at 144, but it looks (from here) just'bout soon as you got moving - you'd drag a fin. The other thing I see ..no shoulders?!  It's straight in. Two-1/2hrs is a long drive for what I see from that drone.  You are a helluva lot closer which = faster/cheaper to what I would call a 'drooler' small wave.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmXBc-n-5hE


Jim
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: JEG on February 10, 2019, 01:58:17 PM
I like tiny waves with my 14ft and you also get much longer rides than short board 8)
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: Night Wing on February 10, 2019, 03:47:37 PM
Winger...  You ch'ure that's got enough 'push'?  Lucky, you at 144, but it looks (from here) just'bout soon as you got moving - you'd drag a fin.

When it comes to "push", I don't surf my 11'1" board with one single large 9" fin. I surf my long board with a 4 fin quad setup (2, 5") (2, 4"). This fin setup provides enough speed for these tiny waves combined with my board's 173 liters and my 144 lbs physical weight.
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: Night Wing on February 10, 2019, 04:59:28 PM
@ Wetstuff

I forgot to add this. I think you're looking at the very tiny waves that are breaking near the beach. Those are not the tiny waves I sup surf. Go back and look at the video again. Skip forward to the 1:20 time mark of the video and then resume the video.

At this time, the drone is very high in the air and it rotates around where you'll looking straight out from the beach towards the Gulf of Mexico. There you will see those tiny waves which are "not" breaking. These waves look like ripples on the water. Those are the tiny waves are I sup with my long 11'1" board. I'm usually anywhere between 200 to 300 yards out from the beach.

I also forgot to add, my 11'1" One World is a custom built board. My rails are thinned out too with a drawn in pointed nose and a narrow pin tail.
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: surfercook on February 10, 2019, 09:51:52 PM
If it swells, ride it! I'd take that beautiful blue TX wtaer and pristine coastline any day. Must be nice and warm.
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: Scallop on February 11, 2019, 04:44:47 AM
Surfin' the Gulf, I'm with you man. Any rideable wave is a good one on the Golfo to me.

I picked up a 9-6 Steeze and I'm surprised at what the thing will catch and ride out. I'm talking total ankle slappers just as good as my 11 did or better and I'm no light weight.

Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: JimK on February 11, 2019, 07:10:07 AM
The funnest way to ride tiny waves I found is a 14Ft touring/Raceboard but I haven't dialed in SUP foiling yet
Thant could be another go to

just my 2cents
jimK
Extreme Windsurfing
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: RideTheGlide on February 11, 2019, 08:04:04 AM
The funnest way to ride tiny waves I found is a 14Ft touring/Raceboard but I haven't dialed in SUP foiling yet
Thant could be another go to

just my 2cents
jimK
Extreme Windsurfing

I am definitely going to be looking for the small stuff on my touring board this year and if I manage to get another board this year it will be an all around that is geared toward surfing. Waves in NC tend to be on the small side.
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: Wetstuff on February 12, 2019, 09:49:29 AM
No disputes, folks.  I'd dearly love a small, useful wave - and a tanker would be perfect to extract all the available energy.  I just didn't expect Wingers walk-out to be so long/far.  We can be overhead in three paces - then paddle to a bar which may be 15yds before it's overhead again.  His light weight must also be a big help. I'd love to be able to leave a 12" concrete blocks worth on the beach. 

...and, be close enough to MEX to snag some pushy stuff.


Jim
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: Badger on February 12, 2019, 12:30:43 PM
My JL M-12'6 loves tiny waves.   8)
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: supsean on February 14, 2019, 07:21:37 AM
Question: Is a thruster or a single fin better for tiny waves? Or twin fins?  I was thinking about taking out my 10'6" BIC (instead of my 8'9" allwave) next time the waves were tiny.
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: Night Wing on February 14, 2019, 09:42:17 AM
@ supsean

When viewing the first video with the married couple, it is a shame the dude gives the length and width of the boards they're surfing those tiny waves on, but he never gives the volume of liters the rented boards are and he never shows the bottom of the boards to expose the fin boxes for fin setups (single, thruster, etc).

I'm a detailed oriented guy. I don't know why people don't give all the pertinent info besides length and width of their boards when I watch YouTube videos. I'm also looking at fin setups. This is one of my "pet peeves" since I'm looking for this info.

As for me, my custom 11'1" One World has 5 fin boxes. I've never experimented with one single fin with regards to sup surfing tiny waves. Just a thruster or quad fin setup.

When it comes to sup surfing my One World, with it's thinned out rails and narrow pin tail for surfing, it likes a quad 4 fin setup (2, 5") (2, 4"). This quad fin setup generates speed even in tiny waves.

When I ordered my One World, I ordered 6 fins for it:

1, 9"
2, 5"
2, 4"
1, 2.25"

I ordered 6 fins for my 8'11" Hammer as well with the only difference being the big fin on my Hammer is (8.75"). If I was going to experiment again, I was thinking of taking off my (2, 4" fins) on my Hammer and replacing the (2, 5" fins) on my One World with the (2, 4" fins) from my Hammer.

This would give my One World a different quad 4 fin setup which would be (4, 4") and see how my One World reacts in tiny waves with regards to the board's 173 liters and my 144 lbs physical weight. This fin setup should generate even more speed........at least in theory.

If the quad (4, 4") fin setup worked well for tiny waves, then I would wait for the days where the surf is forecast to be 2'-4' waves and see how this combo works for these height waves.

But I have to wait now until the water temperature gets back into "my comfort zone" which is normally around the last week of March or the first week of April since I don't wear a wetsuit.
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: TortillaSUP on February 14, 2019, 02:48:25 PM
Winger...  You ch'ure that's got enough 'push'?  Lucky, you at 144, but it looks (from here) just'bout soon as you got moving - you'd drag a fin. The other thing I see ..no shoulders?!  It's straight in. Two-1/2hrs is a long drive for what I see from that drone.  You are a helluva lot closer which = faster/cheaper to what I would call a 'drooler' small wave.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmXBc-n-5hE


Jim

In the winter, I live about 2 hours south of Matachen Bay... it’s possible to surf that glassy little wave for nearly 2 km.  The depth in the bay is about 1 meter forever. 
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: Wetstuff on February 16, 2019, 08:53:27 AM
T-S,  That's F'ing torture to look at that.  If something happened to my wife, I'd buy the nearest casita.   I'm glad you have such good fortune to spend winters in MEX.  Cheers.

Jim
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: CaptainKook on February 17, 2019, 02:38:07 AM
I’m surprised the Aussie couple were doing so well on 33” wide boards. I’ve been looking for a ‘longer’ board for the same purpose, tiny waves, and wasn’t considering anything over 30”, now may have to change that.  NightWing, being rental boards they’re probably higher volume if they are 33” ?  Also as supsean asked, I would think a single fin would be better for tiny waves?  For the same reason most prone longboards have a single fin?  Wouldnt thrusters with angled inwards create more drag, at least at first?
Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: Night Wing on February 17, 2019, 09:19:34 AM
I’m surprised the Aussie couple were doing so well on 33” wide boards. I’ve been looking for a ‘longer’ board for the same purpose, tiny waves, and wasn’t considering anything over 30”, now may have to change that.  NightWing, being rental boards they’re probably higher volume if they are 33” ?  Also as supsean asked, I would think a single fin would be better for tiny waves?  For the same reason most prone longboards have a single fin?  Wouldnt thrusters with angled inwards create more drag, at least at first?

This is going to be a long post so please bare with me, but since I'm a detailed oriented person, I think you'll find this long post an interesting read based on my observations.

I already had my 8'11" x 31" x 4" @ 140 liters Hammer to sup surf on and it is a very good at sup surfing moderate height waves (2'-6') with it's 5 fin boxes and the fin setups (and length of fins), but it wasn't the best for tiny waves. I guessed since I weighed 146 lbs, this was too much weight for the 140 liters. In other words, the tiny wave just didn't generate enough speed energy wise. Since I had my Hammer for sup surfing, I wanted my second sup for mainly flat water paddling and with the hopes it would surf too. So a second longer length board was needed. I was initially looking at 10'6" x 31" @ 170 liters Hammer with 5 fin boxes with chisel tail.

Then one day, "Lady Luck" came my way. While looking at the streaming webcam at a Palms Marina on Lake Conroe (which is not to far from my home), from looking at the streaming webcam, I thought it would be good place to flat water paddle. So I took a ride up there on an early Sunday morning with my wife.

http://www.lakeconroewebcams.com/palms-marina-webcam/

While I was at the marina, I saw two women on sups paddling towards the marina which was their launching point. One was tall woman on an long length sup. When I saw the logo on her board, I knew it was a Starboard sup. Long story short, the two women struck up a friendly conversation with me and my wife. Long story short, the tall woman on the Starboard told me her sup was a 2009 year model 11'2" x 30" @ 168 liters with 3 fin boxes and a rounded pin tail.

She also told me she surfed her Blend down at Surfside, Tx with a thruster (2 + 1) fin setup so she could easily turn her board right and left. But there were times she wished her Blend was 5 liters more in volume (which would have made it 173 liters so keep this number in mind since it will show up later in this post). During the conversation, the tall woman told me she was 5'11" in bare feet and weighed 145 lbs. I'm 5'8" and at the time, I weighed 146 lbs.

Since I was dressed in a ball cap, t-shirt, shorts, socks and tennis shoes; she asked me if I wanted to demo her 11'2" Blend around the marina. At this time I was recovering from major right shoulder surgery. My surgeon told me stay off of a sup for at least a year since the medical procedure I had, takes about a year to heal properly. He didn't want me to fall on my right shoulder from a flat water paddle or get pounded from behind big a big wave. But after a few moments of hesitation, I took the tall woman up on her offer.

After the demo, I had initially been looking at a 10'6" x 31" @ 170 liters Hammer, wide planing nose, with 5 fin boxes and chisel tail. But my thoughts changed to an 11' length sup. Since I liked my 8'11" Hammer, I started looking at a One World. A production make One World comes with these specs which are 11'1" x 30" x 4.6" @ 200 liters with a drawn in pointed nose, 3 fin boxes, one vent plug, two leash plugs and 3 mm thick deck pad which also includes a kick pad.

At my (at the time) 146 lbs, I knew 200 liters of volume would make the board feel "corky" to me. After looking at the One World, since I knew Wardog (Warren) could build me a custom One World, I got in touch with Warren over the phone (voice) and I picked his brain for his first hand knowledge and expertise.

After giving Warren lots of parameters (size of waves, volume of liters, etc, etc, etc) my custom One World started to take shape (as they say). When I gave Warren my order, my specs for my One World came out as follows: 11'1" x 30" x 4.5" @ 173 liters with 5 fin boxes, thinned out rails, 2 vent plugs (gets very hot in southeast Texas where I live during the months of July, August), 2 leash plugs, narrow pin tail, deck pad with a raised kick pad.

I also ordered 6 fins which were: (1, 9") (2, 5") (2, 4") and (1, 2.25" nubster). I figured with these fins; "better to have them and not need them, than to need them and not have them" since these length fins should cover any wave conditions I might find.

Now back to your point of a single fin. If I choose a long 9" single fin to surf a small 1' in height tiny wave, it will work. But if I want to turn the board right or left quickly, the tiny wave might not generate enough speed in conjunction with a single 9" fin, to easily allow me to turn a 11'1" board quickly enough if need be (come up suddenly on a floating piece of debris) with my (at the time 146 lbs physical weight). My right foot would need standing on the kick pad to turn the board quickly in conjunction with my left foot on one of the rails depending if I needed to turn right or left. Quad fin setup generate speed better than single fin (in my opinion).....at least they do where I sup surf at.

So I've found when surfing tiny waves, my 11'1" x 30" x 4.5" @ 173 liters allows me to surf tiny waves with a 4 (quad) fin setup with fins sizes of (2, 5") (2, 4"). This fin setup provides speed plus makes turning the board easy without me having to step back on the kick pad to turn my long One World with my 144 lbs, which is what I weigh right now.

But I like to experiment too. I'm going to take off my (2, 4") fins which are installed on my 8'11" Hammer and replace my (2, 5") fins on my 11'1" One World with the (2, 4") fins from my Hammer so the One World will have a new 4 fin (quad) fin configuration of (4, 4"). Right now, my 11'1" One World covers every thing from flat water paddling, coastal cruising, surfing moderate height waves, surfing tiny waves and surfing bow tanker waves.

A person weighing between 175-215 lbs won't be surfing a tiny wave very well if their board is between 125-160 liters of volume (in my opinion). The board will feel like it is "wallowing in place". An analogy would be like a boat having trouble getting on plane.

So when it comes to sup surfing tiny waves of around 1'-1.5" in height if these types of waves you'll encounter a lot, you'll need some volume in the board if you choose a long 11' board (or longer) in length. And you'll have to take into consideration how much you physically weigh. Basically a compromise between performance and practicality.

Below is a drone video, which I'm going to use as an analogy, which I think you'll find interesting to watch because it shows some small kids learning how to surf on prone surf long boards in tiny waves. The point I'm trying to make in this video, the volume of liters on some of these prone surf boards is "less" than what some of these kids physically weigh when some of these kids are on short boards. The kids on the more volume long boards get the better and longer ride. This video was taken at Port Aransas, Texas on July 4th of 2018.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5CllWKhgFo


 



 














Title: Re: Tiny Waves
Post by: Night Wing on February 26, 2019, 10:33:19 AM
I've been trying to find some tiny waves for sup surfing which shows what I sometimes encounter when the surf forecast height is "wrong". And I found a good one. The video below will show the Galveston Seawall near Pleasure Pier on Galveston Island. It is a 55 second video.

The sup board looks to be a Riviera rental board because one surf shop near the seawall has these boards in their rental fleet. Although the sup's length or fins aren't shown, I've seen these boards before. I'm pretty sure this board is 11' long with one long single fin. This board surfs a tiny wave well for a 11' sup.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZD_eHarCQ8