Author Topic: Slingshot Foils  (Read 1277 times)

clay

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Re: Slingshot Foils
« Reply #15 on: August 10, 2018, 02:41:57 PM »
Hi, I have been riding the 84 ride engine/slingshot foil and really like it, I weigh about 200.  Really stable, predictable, and flies in nothing.
I had invested in Slingshot since their modular system allowed me to also windsurf foil and kite foil. I had resigned myself to the fact that it would not be useful for SUP foil but this is very good news. You had previously been on a different foil correct? Any comparisons you can make?
I have a Foil Science 116 (about the size of the go foil Kai), and I started on a the original gofoil maliko.  Sold the mailko because not upgradable, and to big for a lot of my conditions.  I remember the maliko lifting easily and tracking well in a straight line.  The kai and foil science are both really fast and nimble and good for bigger steeper waves, also sensitive and require concentration and focus.  The manta 84 lifts at like 3-5mph and is so easy to fly, ridiculously easy to fly.  becomes a handful in bigger or steeper waves, and I suspect lighter guys would want the 76.  Both foil science and ride engine/slingshot are completely modular and all the parts are interchangeable and upgradable, biggest selling point for me.   Also both local for me so I can go talk to the guys if I need help or want to demo something.
Aloha, I welcome and appreciate all responses of positivity and good feeling.

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LM

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Re: Slingshot Foils
« Reply #16 on: August 11, 2018, 03:16:13 AM »
As surfcowboy said they are sized more like the go foils now, seems like a pretty reasonable option.

That's a great chart! & appears to be much more accurate (especially considering the GF sizes, although a couple of them still seem a bit larger than what we calculated) than most other info. I've seen.

I don't mean to hijack the thread but since it appears we're not on your guys radar I wanted to list our sizes as well since our foil sizes are more geared for SUP/surf:

The Ke Nalu 'Iwa 580 wing has a surface area of 1084cm2, a wingspan of 58cm with an aspect ratio of 3.33

                  'Iwa 775- Surface are of 1496cm2, Wingspan 77.5cm, aspect ratio 4.14 (this is the "go to" size for most & has been getting great reviews)

                  970 (currently being tested, available soon)- Surface are of 1994cm2, Wingspan 97cm, aspect ratio 4.88 (this is a dedicated downwinder foil)

More info. on our website www.kenalu.com & please feel free to P.M. here or email through customerservice@kenalu.com with any questions.

APPST_Paddle

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Re: Slingshot Foils
« Reply #17 on: August 11, 2018, 03:44:38 AM »
So, if you had to pick between 2018 Slingshot foils for kiting and then moving into SUP - H2 or H4? Sounds like H2 may be easier to learn on, H4 is better for progression (turning on waves, etc.)
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Dwight (DW)

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Re: Slingshot Foils
« Reply #18 on: August 11, 2018, 06:38:04 AM »
As surfcowboy said they are sized more like the go foils now, seems like a pretty reasonable option.

That's a great chart! & appears to be much more accurate (especially considering the GF sizes, although a couple of them still seem a bit larger than what we calculated) than most other info. I've seen.

I don't mean to hijack the thread but since it appears we're not on your guys radar I wanted to list our sizes as well since our foil sizes are more geared for SUP/surf:

The Ke Nalu 'Iwa 580 wing has a surface area of 1084cm2, a wingspan of 58cm with an aspect ratio of 3.33

                  'Iwa 775- Surface are of 1496cm2, Wingspan 77.5cm, aspect ratio 4.14 (this is the "go to" size for most & has been getting great reviews)

                  970 (currently being tested, available soon)- Surface are of 1994cm2, Wingspan 97cm, aspect ratio 4.88 (this is a dedicated downwinder foil)

More info. on our website www.kenalu.com & please feel free to P.M. here or email through customerservice@kenalu.com with any questions.

Lane, the Naish foil designer says “All Naish Wing areas are measured in "Projected Area". Whilst actual surface area is useful for calculating parasitic drag and the like, it is projected are that will have the most importance to a ride”

Are your numbers projected, and do you know from measuring others, who is using projected and who is using surface area.

These charts could be worthless with this monkey wrench thrown in.

LM

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Re: Slingshot Foils
« Reply #19 on: August 11, 2018, 07:01:59 AM »
As surfcowboy said they are sized more like the go foils now, seems like a pretty reasonable option.

That's a great chart! & appears to be much more accurate (especially considering the GF sizes, although a couple of them still seem a bit larger than what we calculated) than most other info. I've seen.

I don't mean to hijack the thread but since it appears we're not on your guys radar I wanted to list our sizes as well since our foil sizes are more geared for SUP/surf:

The Ke Nalu 'Iwa 580 wing has a surface area of 1084cm2, a wingspan of 58cm with an aspect ratio of 3.33

                  'Iwa 775- Surface are of 1496cm2, Wingspan 77.5cm, aspect ratio 4.14 (this is the "go to" size for most & has been getting great reviews)

                  970 (currently being tested, available soon)- Surface are of 1994cm2, Wingspan 97cm, aspect ratio 4.88 (this is a dedicated downwinder foil)

More info. on our website www.kenalu.com & please feel free to P.M. here or email through customerservice@kenalu.com with any questions.

Lane, the Naish foil designer says “All Naish Wing areas are measured in "Projected Area". Whilst actual surface area is useful for calculating parasitic drag and the like, it is projected are that will have the most importance to a ride”

Are your numbers projected, and do you know from measuring others, who is using projected and who is using surface area.

These charts could be worthless with this monkey wrench thrown in.

I'm 99% sure ours are also projected (they were sized by my 3D design guy). I know when we've attempted to look at others it's projected area we were looking at (& what we found with Naish foils is that we agreed with what they reported...not so much with others. Those that do report their sizing anyway) but honestly I have no idea what others are doing when measuring their own & it does make it confusing because everyone sizes seem to be all over the map. I agree with what you mentioned Nils had to say about the comparison between actual & projected. & also the fact that without everyone measuring the same way it does throw a wrench in the works.


daswusup

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Re: Slingshot Foils
« Reply #20 on: August 11, 2018, 08:40:43 AM »
I have the H2, H5 and Infinity 76 wings and all of the various masts and the switch fuse. I absolutely love the interchangeability of all these parts. This system works really well for me because I use them for kiting, surfing and sup surfing. I started my accumulating wings problem last fall. Just got the Infinity 76 a few weeks ago and am loving it. I have logged a ton of hours kiting on all 3 and a around 30 sessions of supping and surfing. I have had many reef strikes with these wings and have been blown away at the durability. A direct smash into a rock has only resulted in a small scratch that can bee easily sanded out. I have mostly been connecting the mast right into the wings as opposed to aft of the wing. This is another awesome tuning option which changes the amount of lift and turnyness. 

 Here are my reviews:

H5- fast turny kiting wing. Likes fast speeds. Stalls easily at around 10mph. Great fun behind a boat.

H2- Heaps of lift at low speeds and stable left to right. I have had most of my surf sessions on this and had a bunch of short flights right out of the gates. I should note that most of my surf sessions have been at peaky beachbreaks, not the optimal foil conditions but fun.  I have had a bunch of time pumping this one with a kite in 8-10 mph of wind(not even capping) It is a really smooth pumper which enables me to kite through large holes in the wind. This has helped pumping in the surf immensely. Pitch control is fairly user friendly.

Infinity 76- Only had a few surfs and few hours kiting on this one so far. Stable, stable, stable. This one doesn't shoot out and breach easily like the H2. It is very easy to maintain elevation. Stability left to right is solid. I actually prefer the H2's slightly more turnyness to this one. This one seems to take a little more speed to get up than the H2 but once up will go slower without stalling. This probably has to do with the lower aspect design. I am still getting to know this wing. Its really predictable in all directions. This will probably be my go to wing in most wave surfing situations except really small surf. I just ordered the Infinity 84 to cover that situation.

Having all of these wings and two different length masts 24" and 35.5" and the adjustable track mounts and the switch fuse, has been really exciting to go out and try different setups. I have been prone surfing and kiting on a 5'6" Slingshot Simulator soft top board and using my older Hokua 8' 10" 115L for suping. I have been going strapless on all but am going to try some on the Hokua. The problem with that is that when its really choppy and hard to sup, I end up proning the Hokua, and wouldn't be able to prone with straps. I guess I could remove them for that situation.

Anyway, that's what I know. I will post review of the Infinity 84 after I get some time on it.
Oh, and I did attempt some dock starts on the 76 yesterday and was able to get short rides. The 84 will become my urban assault wing.
I also have a banshee bungee that I have been playing around with.

The weight of the Slingshot system doesn't seem to be a problem for me. I believe that the durability is a worthwhile tradeoff.
-Tom

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Re: Slingshot Foils
« Reply #21 on: August 11, 2018, 10:48:58 AM »
Nice review daswusup looking forward to your incite on the 84".

I like the idea of a completely interchangeablity foil system. I have a couple of questions if you can.
Would putting the mast further back on the fuselage, give it more or less lift surfing?
Any idea if they have plans on a bigger downwind type for foil? 


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SanoSlatchSup

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Re: Slingshot Foils
« Reply #22 on: August 11, 2018, 11:53:12 AM »
Would putting the mast further back on the fuselage, give it more or less lift surfing?
It's easiest for me to think of all of this foil(ing) geometry in the simplified analogy of standing on top of a teeter-totter, adjusting your weight and foot placement on top of it so as to be able to attempt to balance it level.

With that in mind, where you put the fulcrum plays a big roll in that, and the amount of teeter-totter (now think SUP/surfboard) that you have out in front vs behind that fulcrum has a big effect on that....and how readily you're going to be able to quickly adjust that teeter-totter/board as you're going down the line at 10-15 mph (or even faster at times) on a wave.

So now as far as your question goes, moving the mast further forward on the fuselage, is like moving the "fulcrum" (the tip of the wing is what I've personally found it to be) back...and thus giving you more teeter-totter/board out in front of you, making it less easy to "lift" the front end of it up. So if you were on the teeter-totter, you'd instinctively move back further on it to make it easier to lift that now longer front end...so you'd have to do the same when trying to lift the front of your board/foil.

When talking with the new guys getting into the sport, and trying to help them as much as is possibly "on the beach" (ya just gotta got experiment in the water with it really)...I use the teeter-totter example, and it seems to help them some when out on the water figuring what the board/foil is telling them just by how they're being thrown off of it initially.  :)

Just my take on it anyway.
Me: 6'1"/200...9'6" Bob Pearson "Laird Noserider"...9'6" Costa Azul Wide Body...14' Lahui Kai "Manta"...8'0" WaveStorm for when proning urges still hit, and now a 7'3" Chuck Glynn foil board.