Author Topic: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises  (Read 7118 times)

eastbound

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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2015, 05:22:58 AM »
got nasty bursitis years ago from over-practicing tennis serve, followed by hitting with a ball machine for an hour. The machine won. I was debilitated for months. Functional only after 2 months of rest, then 3 months of PT.
I can feel the pain slightly in connection with paddling, but the range of motion is very limited compared to big topspin tennis swing and serve. Havent played tennis since i trashed shoulder.

Shoulder injuries suck most when trying to sleep. any shift or movement in the night complicates the shoulder and wakes one with pain. i am very careful with mine--anything remotely like the bursitis i had would make paddling out of the question. I couldnt take my damn wallet out of my back pocket--carrying grocery bags was a non-starter.
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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2015, 10:57:08 AM »
This video explains why strengthening the rotator cuff muscles is so important:



Robert this was so enlightening!  I essentially did not understand the principal behind the mechanics and exercises. 
Rotator cuff type injuries and site of pain can vary. My pain was deep inside the socket where your clavicle meets with the shoulder joint. When the ortho doc suggested it was rotator cuff/impingement I was like no way, as the pain wasn't on the outside. But after 3 weeks of PT, the 2 year pain I had endured had already subsided substantially. I couldn't believe it.

Basically had me doing some of the exercises in the video and more with a weight which essentially encompasses using all the muscles of the shoulder. This helps bring blood flow to the area as well to heal.
Checking in here, almost 3 months later and I'm almost back to 100%.

It looks like it wasn't bursitis but more tendon related. Stretching got me back. Ugh, can't there just be a pill? ;)

got nasty bursitis years ago from over-practicing tennis serve, followed by hitting with a ball machine for an hour. The machine won. I was debilitated for months. Functional only after 2 months of rest, then 3 months of PT.
I can feel the pain slightly in connection with paddling, but the range of motion is very limited compared to big topspin tennis swing and serve. Havent played tennis since i trashed shoulder.

Shoulder injuries suck most when trying to sleep. any shift or movement in the night complicates the shoulder and wakes one with pain. i am very careful with mine--anything remotely like the bursitis i had would make paddling out of the question. I couldnt take my damn wallet out of my back pocket--carrying grocery bags was a non-starter.

Since this is such a complex joint and so elemental to what we do it is very encouraging to hear the different scenarios people have been through.  Almost want to make a separate thread called "What's your shoulder story"  but I don't like to fragment or derail, thread momentum such a delicate thing.

Again, Robert that last vid was great I'm going to watch more of his stuff,  I know he cant say it but I bet he is talking about P90x.  Right now I'm not a happy camper but "hope springs eternal"  so you planted the seed of hope. Arigato amigo.
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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #17 on: May 07, 2015, 11:48:24 AM »
When I was getting out of college, my Dad said to me: "I don't really have much advice for your career, you will be successful, BUT if I have one thing I want you to remember it is to exercise and stretch your shoulders EVERY DAY".

He had shoulder surgery around that time, and has been able to rehab since, but it stuck with me.

I sometimes let the shoulder work lapse, and pay for it. However, it is amazing how quickly you can rehab them with good solid work like shown above. 1 or 2 sessions and they are good again. I like the exercises shown,  should get a band. I do more yoga, mobility, and bar work.
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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #18 on: May 26, 2015, 09:55:11 AM »
Have found that stretching and yoga have helped mobility in my shoulders and hips a lot.  Yoga is good in that it gets you to focus where and how to stretch.  After doing yoga for 14 days in a row on a vacation realized that my stretching routine was lacking a lot.  Now back home have been incorporating yoga poses and stretches and really like the benefits.  Lucky too that my daughter helps out as she knows all the different poses which sorts out my very poor form.  Will never get to be very flexible - but should help reduce injury.

Really like the fancy named savasana pose the most - which is basically lie flat on your back and chill.  :)

http://yoga.about.com/od/yogaposes/a/savasana.htm
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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #19 on: May 27, 2015, 05:09:44 PM »
Thanks for posting this. My shoulder has been bugging me for months (but I bought a board anyway), so this will be helpful.

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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #20 on: February 04, 2017, 01:50:22 PM »
Anyone here dealt with torn tendons without surgery and got back to the sport?
THe repair healing takes 6 months minimum I am told...hence my desire to avoid it

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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #21 on: February 04, 2017, 04:39:55 PM »
Appreciate the interesting videos.  Both my wife and I have shoulder issues and maybe these suggested
exercises will help. 
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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #22 on: February 11, 2017, 04:28:51 PM »
Been dealing with a sore shoulder this winter, think I tore it up last season paddling. Didn't get out as much as I usually do, so didn't have the conditioning, but paddled hard with big blades the few times I did get out. Been resting it and seeing a Chinese massage therapist, whom I'm afraid of, he's been cupping it and getting in super deep with the massage. Doesn't wake me up late night anymore. Next phase is to start strengthening it back up, and start looking for some smaller bladed paddles. Thanks for posting the videos, exactly what I needed.
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Night Wing

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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #23 on: February 11, 2017, 08:25:08 PM »
I've had a sore shoulder for a week. I jammed my right shoulder on the side of a door way a week ago. I think I've got a case of shoulder bursitis, but I really don't know for sure. This upcoming Monday morning I'm calling my orthopedic surgeon to make an appointment and see if he can pin down exactly what is wrong with my shoulder.
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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #24 on: February 12, 2017, 01:34:10 AM »
I thought I tore some tendons a few years ago from over paddling.  I went and saw an orthopedic surgeon and after an xray and physical tests he said it was shoulder bursitis.  He sent me to therapy with some anti-inflamitories and after 6 weeks it wasn't much better.  Went back to the orthopedic and he gave me a shot of cortisone and told me to let it rest for a few months to reduce the swelling.   At that point, just reaching over head caused a lot of pain as well as reaching over the car seat to go in reverse.  Not much fun. 

It took just about a year of nothing to get back normal range of motion with no pain.  No paddling, no workouts.  Then slowly getting back into things, and now a few years later everything is back to normal.  Paddling and working out regularly. 

The exercises in the videos are some of the same ones I did in physical therapy, so I still keep doing those.  And I also ended up getting a Kenalu xTuf shaft with the small Wiki Blade which really is easier on the shoulders.

Night Wing

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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2017, 02:47:58 PM »
I had an appointment with my orthopedic surgeon this afternoon. The news was not so good. I saw the x-ray and I've got a bone spur in the rjght AC joint. My surgeon thinks I might also have a small tear in my rotator cuff. So on March 3rd, I've got an MRI scheduled to actually know if I have a small tear or not.

Ah! The gifts of getting old.  ;)
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SeldomScene

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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #26 on: February 16, 2017, 04:20:31 PM »
The good news  (not) is that is if you need surgery on your AC joint, it is one of the most painful surgeries that you can imagine.  Those spurs or rough bones between the acrimoniom and the clavicle are fixed usually by a resection of the clavicle, which is chopping off about a half inch off the clavicle then letting scar tissue fill in the gap.  It's lovely, I have had both sides done.  The surgery is very effective though, once your get about 3-4 days into it you'll be off the oxycontin.  They repaired some big tears in my rotator cuff, labrum, and biceps tendon at the same time, although somewhat inconveniently that requires more incisions, with the arthroscope.  The ac joint is a full ax chop looking incision.  It all worked for me, and hopefully it will for you too, if you need it.  I have had both sides done.  Swim at least 2000 yards a day with no pain.  Plus paddling. 

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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #27 on: February 16, 2017, 05:46:52 PM »
Not necessarily a resection if the spurs are small. I've had several removed in various shoulder surgery, more just a matter of scraping them off.
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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #28 on: February 17, 2017, 05:20:45 AM »
The good news  (not) is that is if you need surgery on your AC joint, it is one of the most painful surgeries that you can imagine.

I had a large bone spur removed in my left shoulder AC joint. After the surgery, it wasn't too painful for me. Of course, I had hydrocodone to "snack on".  ;) The surgery was done on a Wednesday morning and I was in physical therapy two days later (Friday). I did physical therapy for 3 weeks which was on a 3 times per week schedule. I was supposed to be in PT for 3 months, but I did a lot of PT at my home 3 times a week which is why I didn't need to PT for 3 months at the Sports Medicine complex. I'm an outdoor person and I wanted "get on with my outdoor life" I cherish. I rehabbed my left shoulder at my home for the next 11 months, every week, 3 times a week in one hour sessions.

I worry more about the tear, if there is one, in my rotator in my right shoulder. This is why my surgeon is having me take an MRI to see if there is or there isn't a tear. Of course, I'm hoping there is no tear at all.

I picked up my prescription for Lodine and something called a Dose Pack. I take the Lodine first for a week and then the Doe Pack after I finish the Lodine.
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Re: Dealing with Shoulder injury and rotator cuff exercises
« Reply #29 on: February 17, 2017, 09:37:59 AM »
I've had 3 shoulder surgeries over the past 10 years.  One was to remove a bone spur; the other two were subacromial decompressions.  For my shoulders along with a shit storm of other injuries (the list is way too long for my age), I've tried all sort of treatments: massage, physio, chiro, active release therapy, acupuncture, IMS, etc.  All of them have a place and I continue to use them when needed.  One therapy that might not be as well known out there (although maybe it is) is trigger-point injection therapy (TPI).  It's a bit like IMS or acupuncture, but is a little different.  In Canada it is performed by doctors as opposed to physiotherapists or other health care professionals.  It's not a poke, relax and wait treatment like acupuncture and more resembles IMS.  They tend to poke you more in TPI than IMS and really look release bunched up muscle/nerves/fascia. When they hit a tight point that releases, it is crazy!  The muscle grabs the needle before a mini-earthquake/explosion goes off in the muscle area as the muscle releases.

Here's a little blurb on it:

Trigger-Point Injection (TPI) therapy is a long-established medical procedure used to treat muscular and fascial (myofascial) pain. Put simply, fascia is a thin layer of tissue found just underneath the skin of the whole human body. It is rich in nerves and can contribute to pain in numerous medical conditions.

The process of TPI therapy involves the insertion of a small hypodermic needle into trigger-points (areas of contracted muscle fibres which are identifiable as painful bands/nodules on clinical examination). A very small amount of local anaesthetic is injected when the needle is inserted. The combination of the needle insertion and local anaesthetic can help relax these abnormally contracted strands of muscle, relieving pain and restoring normal muscle function/range of motion.


I've found TPI to be quite helpful with recovery.  It really loosens things up and helps with the process of increasing flexibility and reducing pain to allow you to get on with the strengthening component of recovery.  The treatment is used for all sorts of injury recoveries, but they say it is especially helpful for shoulder injury and surgery recovery.

Oh, I also think recovery is aided by lots of sex (I tell my wife that), Guinness (I tell my friends that), and pizza/movie nights (I tell my kids that...though they don't need much convincing).
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