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Messages - ukgm

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1
Downwind and Racing / Re: What would you ask Michael Booth?
« on: Today at 03:17:42 PM »
BMI is individually useless, but as a population measure, it's useful and relevant. Unless perhaps we're all becoming taller and more muscular.

On my long trip across the country in 2007 it was easy to see how fatness varies state to state. In Michigan, I'm a skinny guy.  And there's the Maui hotness measure that Chan told me about years ago--On Maui a male 10 is a 4 with a job.

The bmi was actually a statistical concept created back in the late 1800's and was never interned to be applied as western civilisation has done. Blame your governments for that one.

2
Downwind and Racing / Re: What would you ask Michael Booth?
« on: Today at 01:48:57 AM »
Not as muscled up as Boothy for a lightweight very lean rider 140-160 lbs -> but has plenty with very low body fat mass.  Any of the top pros have about the same BF% ie very low probs top 3% and def below the -2SD line.  This is key with adequate muscle mass then endurance.  Light weight muscled up with endurance balance technique skill willpower etc is hard to beat.  Boothy and Travis etc can get it done at higher BW but they also have very low fat mass ie. very good strength to weight -> and very good power to weight ratios.  Kai is so busy with other watersports but still has time to go to the gym plus do HIIE like any top elite endurance athlete. Oh here is pic of small and skinny Kai.  ;)

"For me, training is really fun, as my gym is the entire island of Maui. I work out in a physical gym three times a week and also on the beach doing runs in soft sand along with other exercises during the run. I also spend so much time on the water surfing, windsurfing, kitesurfing, standup paddling, canoe surfing—you name it."

"The workout is awesome because you use the natural terrain to torture yourself—tree limbs for pull ups, soft sand hills for sprints, deep sand for running, and waist-deep water for sprints when you really want to push."

http://www.grindtv.com/wellness/world-champion-paddleboarder-kai-lenny-shares-his-fitness-routine/#DLcVl814sPWEK84e.97

I doubt that's 3%. Even a tour cyclist or bodybuilder can't maintain that long for safety reasons. It's probably around 5. Impressive though. One thing I would suggest us the diversity of sup athlete background being what it is, I wouldn't read too much into what everyone does until you get another 5-10 years worth of natural selection and a fresh generation of paddlers.

3
Downwind and Racing / Re: What would you ask Michael Booth?
« on: March 24, 2017, 04:17:05 PM »
Those links give lots of answers. I might be preacheching 70s science per ukgm, but in the ballpark i am right  ;)

I wonder just how much endurance training load (or hours) he does paddling.
It's not the hours you put in, it's what you put into the hours ;)

That's why I used the expression 'training load'.

4
Downwind and Racing / Re: What would you ask Michael Booth?
« on: March 24, 2017, 01:43:46 PM »
Those links give lots of answers. I might be preacheching 70s science per ukgm, but in the ballpark i am right  ;)

I wonder just how much endurance training load (or hours) he does paddling.

5
Gear Talk / Re: Race boards, prescribed paddle weights and volume.
« on: March 24, 2017, 06:55:14 AM »
The Vortex is intended for flat water only. If you want a board for rougher waters then that's the Equinox. I liked the 2016 Equinox - it was similar to the Ace but easier to use, except in surf. Very fast, and more stable than the 14x25 Ace. One of their team riders won the Fiji race on one, against the usual Starborg competition, and conditions were pretty choppy.

Yep, it was literally based on the Ace. A few of the locals like it. The Vortex is very much like the older SB sprint but with a more organically shaped nose.

6

Boothy and Mocke are at or near the top because they incorporate strength training.  If they did not -> they would not be where they are.  ;)

We don't know that. You can't isolate the effect of one facet of training from another. I'm not saying that's the case here but sometimes training trends can be 'in spite of' not 'because of'. Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm off to the garage to, er, lift some steel...........

7
Gear Talk / Re: Race boards, prescribed paddle weights and volume.
« on: March 23, 2017, 03:32:45 AM »
(especially a flat water one) is created with the assumption that the board remains flat in the water. Each design will vary in how much efficiency it loses as it comes off its unweighted lateral plane. Some suffer remarkable rail steer, and/or an increase in drag. If you are a tall, heavy, power paddler then inaccuracies in your technique will be multiplied in terms of yaw relative to a lighter less powerful paddler. So the powerful paddler can find a loss of tracking and increased drag that far outweighs any theoretical advantage of a small drop in width. This can be compensated for, to a degree, but going wider and by other design differences.


On a related theme, for those interested, I have just been told that the 14ft 26 inch width Mistral Vortex flatwater board will (like its narrower brother) also be coming out soon in an 'XL' version and now rated upto paddlers 100kg in weight. If so, that stands out as a viable option for competitive (but) larger paddlers.

8

"For endurance athletes, such as kayak/surfski paddlers, strength training provides an important physical counterbalance to the repetitious movements associated with the boat and paddle.While nothing can replace sport specific training for increased performance (you have to go paddling to become a faster paddler), supplementing with some weight training will make you a stronger, more complete athlete. This will ensure that you correct imbalances in muscle groups and strengthen the areas around your joints, which is vital for injury prevention."


This is key for me. If health issues aren't an issue, I wouldn't even start to think about strength work to improve SUP racing unless you're doing at least 6-7 hours training a week (and even that is low in endurance athlete terms).

9
Downwind and Racing / Re: What would you ask Michael Booth?
« on: March 22, 2017, 06:50:49 AM »
The coach of my sup training group has arranged for Michael Booth to give us a Skype sup clinic. To get the most out of it I want to make sure I have some good questions to ask the pro.

What would you ask him?

1) Whether he has ever been tested in a lab ?
2) What is his Vo2 max if he knows it.
3) Does he train with a structure ?
4) Does he perform strength training and what are his thoughts on it ?

10
Gear Talk / Re: Race boards, prescribed paddle weights and volume.
« on: March 22, 2017, 04:54:21 AM »
At your height and weight I don't think you'll be any faster on a 14x25 than a 14x26. You might even be slower over a reasonable distance.

Purely out of curiosity, what makes you say that ? Increased wetted area in the wrong places or lack of stability ?
Those factors for sure. But first let's assume that you are tall enough that 1" narrower width makes negligible difference to how easy it is for you to execute your stroke properly. Then perhaps the main one (and linked to those) is how well you can keep your board on an even keel. This is something that Danny Ching (who has tended not to use uber-narrow boards) used to emphasise in the early days of race SUP but is rarely mentioned these days. A board design (especially a flat water one) is created with the assumption that the board remains flat in the water. Each design will vary in how much efficiency it loses as it comes off its unweighted lateral plane. Some suffer remarkable rail steer, and/or an increase in drag. If you are a tall, heavy, power paddler then inaccuracies in your technique will be multiplied in terms of yaw relative to a lighter less powerful paddler. So the powerful paddler can find a loss of tracking and increased drag that far outweighs any theoretical advantage of a small drop in width. This can be compensated for, to a degree, but going wider and by other design differences.

In general, I have a different emphasis than you do about where speed comes from, which probably reflects the fact that you compete at eg. cycling whereas I used to compete at swimming. pdxmike and UKRiversurfers for instance will know what I mean. In swimming, someone who used to be a fast competitive swimmer but has now gone to seed will always be faster than someone who is supremely fit but has never developed good technique. So, for me, I tend to look at technique and the way it interacts with the board as the easy way to increased speed, rather than emphasising so much aspects of fitness and strength as you guys have mainly been talking about (and yes, of course power at the blade captures some important aspects of technique, but technique is hugely more than that).

It is scary to see someone who is a skilled paddler from another discipline apply their feel for the water to SUP. They just seem to be able to extract speed from the water effortlessly, in a way that a much fitter stronger newbie will never do. SUP is an intensely technical sport IMO, far beyond that in cycling, running etc (whilst not denying that they have technique aspects also).

To my mind, the reason why Kai was able to kick ass at the ISA relays in 2016 was substantially that he was able to maintain impeccable technique that was perfectly matched to the conditions. Sure, he might be fitter also. But he probably leveraged his superior feel for the water that day, honed through thousands of hours in the water since he was a baby, combined with superb training and instruction from the likes of Dave Kalama. I think this is why the ocean guys generally do better in flat water than the flat water guys do in the ocean. They are used to thinking about how to maximise efficiency through the water, working with the conditions rather than fighting them. Just like in swimming.

Interesting thoughts.

(I should disclose at this point that I'm a former triathlete and competed internationally in surf lifesaving back in the 90's and early 00's. I started out as a swimmer).

11
Gear Talk / Re: Race boards, prescribed paddle weights and volume.
« on: March 22, 2017, 12:52:41 AM »
At your height and weight I don't think you'll be any faster on a 14x25 than a 14x26. You might even be slower over a reasonable distance.

Purely out of curiosity, what makes you say that ? Increased wetted area in the wrong places or lack of stability ?

12
Gear Talk / Re: Race boards, prescribed paddle weights and volume.
« on: March 21, 2017, 03:39:34 PM »
Yeah but with the All Star don't forget that it's all about that all-important built-in "porpoising" effect :) Probably if you are over 85kg you will be too heavy for it to "spring you forward like you have a motor on the back" :)

260L for 95kg is pushing it I'd say. Literally :)

So what you're saying is that I need a 200l custom then ?!
Funny. Actually, I reckon about 310L would be ideal for you.

Sorry, I meant 300L.  Mind you, in a 25 width, that's going to need some major foam.....

13
Gear Talk / Re: Race boards, prescribed paddle weights and volume.
« on: March 21, 2017, 02:15:28 PM »
Yeah but with the All Star don't forget that it's all about that all-important built-in "porpoising" effect :) Probably if you are over 85kg you will be too heavy for it to "spring you forward like you have a motor on the back" :)

260L for 95kg is pushing it I'd say. Literally :)

So what you're saying is that I need a 200l custom then ?!

14
If you're not paddling at least 3-4 times a week, you're not going to be anywhere near your (age governed) best speed.

I also find that for us having a very full time job, it seriously gets in the way of paddling and paddling at your top most definitely.
I supplement week-end paddling with
* yoga, power and hata - great for chore and flexibility
* Foundation Training - helps built a strong base for a strong stroke
And case in point, I am still a crappy paddler....

Yep but all that matters is that you enjoy it. I still put in 12 hours training a week but that is split between bike, SUP and weights and I would be better at any of those if I got rid of the other two. The reality is that I have found ways to 'cheat' my training to get close to my best by cross training and that, these days for me, variety keeps me saner than being fastest in any one of those.

15
Gear Talk / Re: Race boards, prescribed paddle weights and volume.
« on: March 21, 2017, 10:14:53 AM »
^ he said he calculated it from standard naval architecture formulas.

I found it very close to truth and it was an eye opener how much height affects stability.

I think the answer to that question is very board specific…

Agree. Less about volume and more about shape however. A low volume board can be more stable (see Bert Berger video explanations which I agree with).


With that in mind, why the discrepancies ?

You’re a cyclist. Do you really believe marketing fluff weights?


I'm more surprised that they don't go for much heavier weights than they advertise to appear to be more inclusive.

Take the Starboard Allstar 14ft 24.5 width at ~300 litres and they quote a max paddler weight of 85kg. Naish Javelin Maliko is only 260l and they quote 95kg paddler max. Fanatic don't mention one at all for their Strike (at 271l in a 26 width).


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